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God gives Moses a calendar of sacrifices
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Daily Sacrifice
Daily Sacrifice A burnt offering of two lambs of a year old that was performed daily, with one lamb sacrificed in the morning and one at twilight (Exod 29:38–42; Num 28:2–8). Antiochus IV Epiphanes attempted to abolish these sacrifices (see Dan 8:12; 9:21; 11:31; 12:11). For more information, see these
Day of Atonement
Day of Atonement (יוֹם כִּפֻּרִים‎, yom kippurim). A day on which Israel fasted, cleansed the sanctuary of impurity, and dealt with their sin through blood rituals and sending a goat into the wilderness. Took place on the 10th day of the seventh month.
Feast of Booths
Booths, Feast of (חַג הַסֻּכּוֹת‎, chag hassukkoth, σκηνοπηγία, skēnopēgia). Also known by its transliteration, Sukkot. One of Israel’s three great annual festivals, celebrated at the time of the agricultural harvest, in gratitude for Yahweh’s present and historical provision.
Feast of Trumpets
Trumpets, Feast of (זִכְר֥וֹן תְּרוּעָ֥ה‎, zikhron teru'ah). Literally “Memorial of Trumpets”; an Israelite celebration on the first day of the seventh month (Lev 23:24; Num 29:1–6). For more information on Israelite celebrations, see this article: Feasts and Festivals of Israel.
Passover
Passover (פִּסְחָא‎, pischa'; פֶּסַח‎, pesach; Πάσχα, Pascha). A sacred observance in Judaism that commemorates the climactic 10th plague in the book of Exodus, when Yahweh punishes Egypt by killing all the firstborn but “passes over” (פָּסַח‎, pasach) the firstborn of Israel (Exod 12:12–13), resulting
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Booths, Feast of
BOOTHS, FEAST OF. One of ancient Israel’s three giant annual feasts, celebrated in autumn. See CALENDARS, ANCIENT ISRAELITE AND EARLY JEWISH.
Day of Atonement
DAY OF ATONEMENT. A day of fasting, self-denial, and rest on the tenth day of the seventh month (Tishri) on which the sanctuary is cleansed of impurities and the Israelites’ sins are sent away on the scapegoat.A. The Rite in Leviticus 161. Purification of the Sanctuary and Sanctums2. The Scapegoat
Unleavened Bread and Passover, Feasts of
UNLEAVENED BREAD AND PASSOVER, FEASTS OF. “Passover” is the name of the sacrifice that is slaughtered on the 14th day of Nisan and eaten toward evening, at the end of the day or soon after sunset marking the beginning of the 15th day of Nisan. Scripture presents the Passover as the key element of a rite
Weeks, Festival of
WEEKS, FESTIVAL OF. In the Hebrew Bible the second of the three pilgrimage festivals is named “the feast of harvest” (ḥag haqqāṣı̂r [Exod 23:16]), “the feast of weeks” (ḥag šābuʿôt [e.g. Deut 16:10]), and “the day of the first fruits” (yôm habbikkûrı̂m [Num 28:26]).A. Definitions and Sources
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Atonement, Day of
Atonement, Day of. Yom Kippur, the most important day in the religious calendar of Israel, falling on the tenth day of Tishri (the Hebrew month corresponding to mid-September through mid-October). On that day the high priest entered the Holy of Holies of the tabernacle (or temple) to atone for the sins
Booths, Feast of
Booths, Feast of. One of the three great festivals of Israel, celebrating the completion of the agricultural year. The Jews built booths (temporary shelters) to commemorate their deliverance from Egypt by the hand of God (Lv 23:39–43).See Feasts and Festivals of Israel.
Ingathering, Feast of
Ingathering, Feast of. One of the three great festivals of Israel, also called the Feast of Booths, or tabernacles, which celebrated the completion of the agricultural year (Lv 23:39–43).See Feasts and Festivals of Israel.
Passover
Passover. Important Jewish festival celebrating Israel’s redemption from Egypt.See Feasts and Festivals of Israel; Meals, Significance of.
Tabernacles, Feast of
Tabernacles, Feast of. One of the three great festivals of Israel, celebrating the completion of the agricultural year. The Jews built booths or tabernacles (temporary shelters) to commemorate their deliverance from Egypt by the hand of God (Lv 23:33–43).See Feasts and Festivals of Israel.
Trumpets, Feast of
Trumpets, Feast of. Day of solemn rest and remembrance of God’s provision for his people through the Sinai covenant (Lv 23:23–25).See Feasts and Festivals of Israel.
Weeks, Feast of
Weeks, Feast of. Celebration of the wheat harvest (Ex 23:14–17; Dt 16:16), occurring seven weeks after Passover on the sixth day of Sivan (June); also known as the Feast of Pentecost.See Feasts and Festivals of Israel.
Yom Kippur
Yom Kippur. One of the feast days of Israel involving atonement for the sins of the nation (Lv 23:26–32).See Feasts and Festivals of Israel.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Atonement, Day of
Atonement, Day of [Heb. yôm hakkippurîm—lit ‘day of the covering over,’ i.e., ‘day of appeasement’]. The fourth of the five annual feasts of preexilic Israel.The name yôm hakkippurîm (more familiarly Yom Kippur) is derived from the Heb. noun kôp̱er, “ransom” or “hush money” (Ex. 30:12; 1 S. 12:3;
Booths, Feast of
Booths, Feast of This festival, known variously as the Feast of Booths, (Lev. 23:34; Dt. 16:13), Tabernacles (2 Ch. 8:13; Jn. 7:2), or Ingathering (Ex. 34:22), was one of the three major feasts in which all Hebrew males were required to participate each year. It began on the fifteenth day of the seventh
Passover
Passover [Heb. pesaḥ; Gk. páscha; cf. Aram pisḥāʾ; note also Eng. “paschal”]. A major festival held in the spring to commemorate Israel’s deliverance from Egypt. The term is often used of the entire festival celebration (e.g., Ex. 12:48; 2 K. 23:21). It may also designate the Passover sacrifice
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Atonement, Day of
ATONEMENT, DAY OF Yom Kippur, the most important day in the religious calendar of Israel, falling on the 10th day of Tishri (the Hebrew month corresponding to mid-September through mid-October). On that day the high priest entered the Holy of Holies of the tabernacle (or temple) to atone for the sins
Booths, Feast of
BOOTHS*, FEAST OF One of the three great festivals of Israel, celebrating the completion of the agricultural year. The Jews built booths (temporary shelters) to commemorate their deliverance from Egypt by the hand of God (Lv 23:39–43).See also Feasts and Festivals of Israel.
Ingathering, Feast of
INGATHERING*, FEAST OF One of the three great festivals of Israel, also called the Feast of Booths, or Tabernacles, which celebrated the completion of the agricultural year (Lv 23:39–43). See Feasts and Festivals of Israel.
Passover
PASSOVER Important Jewish festival celebrating Israel’s redemption from Egypt. See Feasts and Festivals of Israel; Meals, Significance of.
Shelters, Festival of
SHELTERS, FESTIVAL OF Alternate name for the Festival of Tabernacles. See Feasts and Festivals of Israel.
Tabernacles, Feast of
TABERNACLES*, FEAST OF Also known as the Feast of Booths, Shelters, or Ingathering. It was one of the three great festivals of Israel, celebrating the completion of the agricultural year. The Jews built booths or tabernacles (temporary shelters) to commemorate their deliverance from Egypt by the hand
Trumpets, Festival of
TRUMPETS, FESTIVAL OF Day of solemn rest and remembrance of God’s provision for his people through the Sinai covenant (Lv 23:23–25). See Feasts and Festivals of Israel.
Weeks, Feast of
WEEKS*, FEAST OF Celebration of the beginning of the wheat harvest (Ex 23:14–17; Dt 16:16), occurring seven weeks after Passover on the sixth day of Sivan (June); also known as the Feast of Pentecost. See Feasts and Festivals of Israel.
Yom Kippur
YOM KIPPUR* One of the feast days of Israel involving atonement for the sins of the nation (Lv 23:26–32). See Feasts and Festivals of Israel.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Atonement, Day Of
Atonement, Day of (Heb. yom kippur), a festival observed in Israel ten days after the fall new year (Lev. 16:29; 23:27) to purify the sanctuary and altar and atone for the sins and impurities of the high priest and Israel for the past year (16:1–34; 23:26–32; Num. 29:7–11). The high priest sacrificed
Passover
Passover (pas´oh-vuhr), a religious festival commemorating God’s deliverance of the Jews from slavery. The English term translates the Hebrew word pesakh as used in Exod. 12:13, “I will pass over you, and no plague shall destroy you when I strike the land of Egypt” (see also vv. 23, 27). In the Bible,
Tabernacles, Festival Of
Tabernacles, Festival of (or Booths, Ingathering, Heb. sukkot), along with Passover and the Festival of Weeks, one of three major pilgrimage festivals of Judaism. Celebrated for eight days from the fifteenth of Tishri (September/October), it was Israel’s joyous harvest festival to mark the ingathering
Trumpets, Festival Of
Trumpets, Festival of, a celebration on the first day of the seventh month (Tishri) of the Hebrew religious year. Its name comes from its designation as a “day of (horn-)blasts” (Num. 29:1; cf. Lev. 23:24; Num. 10:10). It was a day of rest. An extra set of new-moon offerings was brought (except for one
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Passover
PASSOVER. The festival instituted by God for Israel at the time of the Exodus in order to commemorate the night when Yahweh spared all the firstborn of the Israelites but struck dead all those of the Egyptians (Ex 12:1–30, 43–49).The Heb. word pesaḥ (Gr. pascha) is of uncertain origin. G. E. Mendenhall
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Atonement, Day of
ATONEMENT, DAY OF (Heb. yôm hakkippurîm). On the 10th day of the 7th month (Tishri, September/October), Israel observed its most solemn holy day. All work was forbidden and a strict fast was enjoined on all of the people.
Passover
PASSOVER. The Passover of Ex. 12 concerns (1) the original historic event of Israel’s deliverance from Egyp. bondage; (2) the later recurrent institutional commemoration of that event (Mishnah Pesaḥim 9:5). Closely conjoined, though separate, are (3) the prohibition of *leaven, symbolizing the haste
Tabernacles, Feast of
TABERNACLES, FEAST OF. Heb. ḥaḡ hassukkôṯ, ‘festival of booths’ (Lv. 23:34; Dt. 16:13), or ḥaḡ hā’āsîp̱, ‘festival of ingathering’ (Ex. 23:16; 34:22). This was one of the three great pilgrimage-festivals of the Jewish year; it was kept for 7 days from the 15th to the 22nd day of the 7th month.
Trumpets, Feast of
TRUMPETS, FEAST OF. ‘Day of blowing the trumpets’ (Heb. yôm terû‘â, Nu. 29:1) or ‘memorial of blowing of trumpets’ (Lv. 23:24). The 7th month in the Jewish *calendar, tišri (Sept./Oct.), was the beginning of the civil year. The first day of the month was to be ‘a day of solemn rest’, in which ‘no
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Atonement, Day of
Atonement, Day ofThe day (Heb. yôm kippur) marking the sober climax in a 10-day cycle at the beginning of the Jewish new year (Heb. rōʾš haššānâ). It is a day of introspection, self-evaluation, and prayer rooted deeply in Israel’s imagination and history.Already in Scripture, this day represented
Passover, Feast Of
Passover, Feast ofA ritual observance of Israel that celebrates Yahweh’s deliverance of the community from Egypt. The observance took place on the 14th day of Nisan (Apr.–May; Abib in older calendars) and included the slaughter of a lamb and its consumption in a meal shared by the whole family. Passover
Sukkoth
Sukkoth (Heb. sukkôṯ)The Feast of Booths (also called Tabernacles and Ingathering), one of the three great pilgrimage feasts.See Tabernacles, Feast of.
Tabernacles, Feast Of
Tabernacles, Feast ofThe final and greatest feast of the Israelite agricultural year, one of three annual pilgrimage festivals (Exod. 23:14–19; 34:22–24; Lev. 23:33–36, 39–43; Num. 29:12–38; Deut. 16:16–17; 31:9–13). It specifically celebrated the harvest of grapes and olives and the end of the harvest
Trumpets, Feast of
Trumpets, Feast of“A day to blow trumpets,” a feast on the first day of the seventh month, Tishri (Sept.–Oct.), beginning Israel’s most sacred month which also included the Feast of Booths and the Day of Atonement. The feast was inaugurated with trumpet blasts (Num. 29:1). All work was to cease and
Weeks, Feast Of
Weeks, Feast ofA spring agricultural festival (ḥag̱ šāḇuʿôṯ; Deut. 16:10) that required a pilgrimage to a sacred site; also termed “the feast of harvest” (ḥag̱ haqqāṣɩ̂r; Exod. 23:16) and “the day of the first fruits” (yôm habbikkûrɩ̂m; Num. 28:26). After the Babylonian Exile, the festival
Yom Kippur
Yom Kippur (Heb. yôm kippûr)The holiest of Jewish holy days from the biblical period on.See Atonement, Day of.
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Atonement, Day of
Atonement, Day of [yôm hakkippurîm “day of the covering over (or propitiation)”]. The most important annual Israelite (and Jewish) fast, held on the tenth day of the seventh month (Tishri; Lev. 23:27; 25:9).From Lev. 16 it appears that even the high priest could not enter the holy of holies at all
Booths, Feast of
Booths, Feast of (Heb. hag̱ hassukkôṯ). One of Israel’s three major feasts, also known as the Feast of Ingathering (Exod. 23:16; 34:22) or the Feast of Tabernacles (2 Chr. 8:13). It began on the fifteenth day of the month of Tishri (mid-October, five days after the Day of Atonement or Tishri 10),
Passover
Passover (Heb. pesaḥ; Gk. páscha; cf. Aram. pisḥā˒),† The spring festival of the Jewish liturgical calendar that commemorates God’s deliverance of the Israelites from Egyptian bondage.
Sukkoth
Sukkoth [sŏokˊəth] (Heb. sukkôṯ). The Feast of Booths (also called Tabernacles and Ingathering), one of the three great pilgrimage feasts in Judaism. See Booths, feast of.
Trumpets, Feast of
Trumpets, Feast of. The “day of blowing the trumpets” (Heb. yôm terû˓â; Num. 29:1) or “memorial of blowing the trumpets” (ziḵrôn terû˓â; Lev. 23:24), which fell on the first day (the new moon) of the seventh month, Tishri (Sept./-Oct.). Announced by the sound of trumpets, all work ceased on
Weeks, Feast of
Weeks, Feast of (Heb. ḥag šāḇu˓ôṯ; Gk. pentēkostḗ). † The second of the three great annual feasts of Israel (Exod. 23:14; 2 Chr. 8:13), to be celebrated seven full weeks (or fifty days) from the beginning of the barley harvest (Lev. 23:15–16; Deut. 16:9). In later Judaism it became an
Yom Kippur
Yom Kippur [yŏm kĭpˊər, yōm kĭ pŏorˊ]. The holiest of Jewish holy days from the biblical period on. See Atonement, Day of.
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Atonement, Day Of
ATONEMENT, DAY OF One of the most solemn holy days of the Jewish year, observed on the tenth day of the seventh month (Tishri, September–October), five days before the Feast of Tabernacles. On this day in ancient Israel, all work was forbidden for all people (including aliens), and a fast was required
Booths, Feast Of
BOOTHS, FEAST OF Also known as the festival of Tabernacles and the festival of Ingathering, a harvest festival listed in Deut 16:13–15 and Lev 23:43 (cf. Ezra 3:4; Zech 14:16). In Exod 23:16 and 34:22, the festival is celebrated at the end of the year, when the fruits of their labors are gathered. According
Passover, Feast Of
PASSOVER, FEAST OF One of the most important feasts of the Israelite calendar. The word “Passover” is an echo of the verb pâsah., “pass over,” indicating that the feast was instituted to commemorate the deliverance of Israel from Egypt when the angel of death passed over the Israelites’ firstborn (Exod
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Atonement, Day of
Atonement, Day of. The annual Jewish fast day (יוֹם הַכִּפֻּרִים‎, ἡμέρα ἐξιλασμοῦ) which falls on the 10th day of the 7th month (Tishri), i.e. roughly in Oct. It is commonly called ‘Yom Kippur’. Its observance is regulated by Lev. 16:23, 27–32, and Num. 29:7–11, all prob. dating from the period of
Expiation, Day of
Expiation, Day of. An alternative name for the Jewish feast usually known as the Day of *Atonement (Tisri 10).
Passover
Passover. The Jewish festival celebrated every spring in connection with the *Exodus. Acc. to the account of its institution in Exod. 12, a lamb is to be slain in each household and its blood sprinkled on the lintel and doorposts of the house in memory of the fact that when the first-born in Egypt were
Tabernacles, Feast of
Tabernacles, Feast of. With the *Passover and *Pentecost, one of the great feasts of the Jewish year. By some critics it is supposed to have been originally a New Year festival, but in the earliest biblical accounts it is described as ‘the feast of ingathering, at the end of the year’ (Exod. 23:16),
Trumpets, Feast of
Trumpets, Feast of. A Jewish feast kept on the first day of the seventh month (i.e. Tishri, Oct.), the observance of which is ordained in Lev. 23:24 and Num. 29:1. It is now regarded by the Jews as New Year’s Day (‘Rosh ha-Shanah’).
Weeks, Feast of
Weeks, Feast of. The Jewish celebration (Exod. 23:16) of the completion of the grain harvest. It was held on the 50th day (hence the Greek title ‘Pentecost’) after the offering of the barley-sheaf at the feast of unleavened bread (i.e. in the late spring or early summer). Two loaves of leavened bread
Yom Kippur
Yom Kippur (יוֹם כִּפּוּר). The Hebrew name of the Day of *Atonement (q.v.).
Key passages
Nu 28:1–29:40

Yahweh spoke to Moses, saying, “Command the Israelites and say to them, ‘You will be careful to present my offering, my food of my offerings made by fire, of a fragrance of appeasement to me, at its appointed time.’ You will say to them, ‘This is the offering made by …