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Gnash
Gnashing of teeth • Gnashing the Teeth
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Gnash
Gnash [Heb. ḥāraq] (Job 16:9; Ps. 35:16; 37:12; 112:10; Lam. 2:16); NEB GRIND, GROUND (Ps. 35:16); [Gk. brygmós]; (Mt. 8:12; 13:42, 50; 22:13; 24:51; 25:30; Lk. 13:28); NEB GRINDING.The Heb. ḥāraq occurs always in connection with šēn, “tooth” (or its plural). That it means “gnash” or “grind” (the
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Gnash
GNASH. To bite with the teeth or to grind the teeth in such a fashion as to show anguish, rage, or remorse. The OT uses the term in (Job 16:9; Ps 35:16; 37:12; 112:10; Lam 2:16). Jesus speaks of the “gnashing of teeth” in (Mt 9:18; Acts 7:54).
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Gnash
GNASH (Heb. ḥāraq). To grate the teeth; “He has gnashed at me with His teeth,” and “gnash their teeth.” Expressions denoting rage or sorrow (Job 16:9; Lam. 2:16).
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Gnash
GnashHeb. harak, meaning “to grate the teeth”, (Job 16:9; Ps. 112:10; Lam. 2:16), denotes rage or sorrow. (See also Acts 7:54; Mark 9:18.)
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Gnash, Gnashing of Teeth
GNASH, GNASHING OF TEETH — to grate or grind one’s teeth together as an expression of hatred and scorn (Job. 16:9). Jesus used the phrase to portray the futility of the wicked who will be judged by God at the end of time (Matt. 13:42, 50).Photo: Levant Photo ServiceExcavations at ancient Ashkelon,
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
GNASH
GNASH<nash> ([חָרַק‎, charaq]; [βρυγμός, brugmos]): “Gnash” is used of grinding or striking together the teeth in rage, pain or misery of disappointment. In the Old Testament it is the translation of charak, a mimetic word, and represents for the most part rage, anger, hatred (Job 16:9, “He gnasheth
A Dictionary of Christ and the Gospels: Aaron–Zion
Gnashing Of Teeth
GNASHING OF TEETH (ὁ βρυγμὸς τῶν δδὁντων, Mt 8:12, 13:42, 50, 22:13, 24:51, 25:30, Lk 13:28).—A phrase describing a gesture which expresses mainly fury or baffled rage: Job 16:9, Ps 35:16, 37:12, Ac 7:54; cf. Ps 112:10 ‘The wicked shall gnash with his teeth, and melt away’; but these OT parallels*
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Gnashing of Teeth
GNASHING OF TEETH Grating one’s teeth together. In the OT gnashing of teeth was an expression of anger reserved for the wicked and for one’s enemies (Job 16:9; Pss. 35:16; 37:12; Lam. 2:16). In the NT gnashing of teeth is associated with the place of future punishment (Matt. 8:12; 13:42, 50). There the
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 2, D–G
Gnashing the Teeth
gnashing the teeth. This expression is used in Hebrew poetic passages to indicate the hatred and scorn of enemies (verb ḥāraq H3080, Job 16:9; Ps. 35:16; 37:12; 112:10; Lam. 2:16). The Greek verb brychō G1107 is used similarly with reference to to the rage of Stephen’s enemies (Acts 7:54), while the
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Gnash
GNASH, nash (חָרַק‎, ḥāraḳ; βρυγμὁς, brugmós): “Gnash” is used of grinding or striking together the teeth in rage, pain or misery of disappointment. In the OT it is the tr of ḥārak, a mimetic word, and represents for the most part rage, anger, hatred (Job 16:9, “He gnasheth upon me with his teeth,”