Loading…
Gleaning
Glean • Gleaners
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Glean, Gleaning
Glean, Gleaning. Practice of allowing the poor to follow reapers in a field to pick up missed spears of grain (cf. Lv 19:9, 10; 23:22; Dt 24:21; Ru 2:2–23). Vineyards, as well as fields of grain, were to be available for gleaning (Lv 19:10; Dt 24:20, 21). Olive trees, however, were not to be gone over
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Gleaning
Gleaning [Heb. lāqaṭ (Ruth 2:2–23; Isa. 17:5), leqeṭ (Lev. 19:9; 23:22), ʿālal (Dt. 24:21; Jer. 6:9), ʿōlēlôṯ (Jgs. 8:2; Isa. 17:6; 24:13; Jer. 49:9; Ob. 5; Mic. 7:1), lāqaš (Job. 24:16)]; AV also GATHER, “some grapes” (Ob. 5); NEB also “stripped” (Isa. 24:13), “filch” (Job 24:6). Hebrew law
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Glean, Gleaning
GLEAN, GLEANING Practice of allowing the poor to follow reapers in a field to pick up missed spears of grain (cf. Lv 19:9; 23:22; Dt 24:19; Ru 2:2–23). Vineyards, as well as fields of grain, were to be available for gleaning (Lv 19:10; Dt 24:20–21). Olive trees, however, were not to be gone over a second
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Glean
GLEAN. To gather or to pick up what was left in the fields after reaping. It applied not only to grain but also to grapes and olives. Pentateuchal laws prohibited an owner from gleaning his own fields, so that the poor, the fatherless, the widow, and the stranger might have food (cf. (Lev 19:9 ff.; 23:22;
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Gleaning
GLEANING (lāqaṭ, ‘to gather, glean’; ‘ālal, ‘to roll, glean, suck’, usually of grapes). Amid the rejoicing of harvest-time a kindly Israelitish law upheld the custom whereby the poor, orphans and strangers were allowed to glean grain, grapes and olives (Lv. 19:9–10; 23:22; Dt. 24:19). *Ruth took full
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Gleaning
GleaningThe practice of gathering, mainly food. It is most often recognized in connection with the story of Ruth and Naomi (Ruth 2) where Ruth gleaned in the fields of Boaz to provide food for her mother-in-law Naomi and herself. The Torah makes provision for those in need (the poor, fatherless, aliens,
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Gleaning
Gleaning (Heb. leqeṭ, from lāqaṭ). The practice of gathering leftover ears of grain, fallen grapes, or other fruit after the harvest. Mosaic law forbade the owner of a field to collect this food, for it was to beleft for the poor, the sojourner, the fatherless, and the widow (Lev. 19:9–10; 23:22;
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Gleaning
GLEANING Gathering food from a harvested field. The Torah commanded that a farmer not reap his field to the absolute furthest extent up to the corners (Lev 19:9–10, 23:22; Deut 24:19–22). That way the poor, widows, orphans, and foreigners could glean the fields for food, as we see in Ruth 2, where Ruth
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Gleaning
Gleaning. The gleaning of fruit trees, as well as of corn-fields, was reserved for the poor. [Corner.]
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Glean
GLEAN. Moses provided a liberal treatment of the poor at the harvest season. In reaping the field the owner was not to “reap to the very corners,” etc. (Lev. 19:9–10); i.e., he was not to reap the field to the extreme edge, or gather together the ears left upon the field in the reaping. In the vineyard
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Glean
GleanThe corners of fields were not to be reaped, and the sheaf accidentally left behind was not to be fetched away, according to the law of Moses (Lev. 19:9; 23:22; Deut. 24:21). They were to be left for the poor to glean. Similar laws were given regarding vineyards and oliveyards. (Comp. Ruth 2:2.)
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Gleaning
GLEANING — the process of gathering grain or other produce left in the fields by reapers (Judg. 8:2; Ruth 2; Is. 17:6). The Old Testament Law required that property owners leave the gleanings of their produce in the fields so they might be gathered by “the poor and the stranger” (Lev. 19:9–10; 23:22).
Key passages
Ru 2:1–23

Now Naomi had a relative of her husband, a prominent rich man from the clan of Elimelech, whose name was Boaz. And Ruth the Moabite said to Naomi, “Please let me go to the field and glean among the ears of grain after someone in whose eyes I may find favor.” And she said …

See also