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Gilgamesh Epic
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
Ancient Babylonian story about Gilgamesh, the powerful king of Uruk (a city in southern Mesopotamia), and his quest for immortality. The tale provides insights into ancient Mesopotamian culture and contains several literary parallels with the book of Genesis, most notably a flood story with significant parallels to Gen 6–9.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Gilgamesh, Epic of
Gilgamesh, Epic of Ancient Babylonian story about Gilgamesh, the powerful king of Uruk (a city in southern Mesopotamia), and his quest for immortality. The tale provides insights into ancient Mesopotamian culture and contains several literary parallels with the book of Genesis, most notably a flood story
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Gilgamesh Epic
GILGAMESH EPIC. A masterpiece of ANE literature, the Gilgamesh Epic (GE) is composed in Akkadian. It features the adventures of Gilgamesh, a king said to rule the S Mesopotamian city of Uruk around 2600 b.c.e. Since Gilgamesh has left us no contemporaneous monuments, scholars debate whether he really
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Gilgamesh Epic
Gilgamesh Epic. Twelve-tablet Babylonian story of Gilgamesh’s quest for immortality. The 11th tablet records a version of the flood.See Flood Myths.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Gilgamesh Epic
GILGAMESH EPIC* Popular legendary composition about a Sumerian hero’s life of adventure and acquisition of wisdom. Gilgamesh was king of Uruk, or Erech (Tell Obeid; modern Warka), at the end of the fourth millennium bc. The legend, which emerged from the first Babylonian dynasty (about 1830–1530 bc),
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Gilgamesh Epic
Gilgamesh EpicPerhaps the most famous masterpiece of ancient Near Eastern literature, undoubtedly due to its flood narrative (though this is actually a late addition). Composed in Akkadian, it features the exploits of Gilgamesh, a possible king of Uruk (biblical Erech, Gen. 10:10) in southern Mesopotamia
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Gilgamesh Epic
GILGAMESH [gĭlˊ gə mĕsh] EPIC.† An Akkadian poem recounting the exploits of the legendary King Gilgamesh, here called two-thirds god and one-third human. It is apparently based upon Sumerian stories associated with Gilgamesh, a Semitic king of the Second Early Dynastic period who fortified Uruk (biblical
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Gilgamesh, Epics of
Gilgamesh, Epics of. The Babylonian Gilgamesh Epic is a long, composite narrative poem known from tablets and fragments dating from c. 1800 to c. 300 bc. These come from several editions, none of them surviving complete. A single edition circulated in the first millennium bc. This is divided into twelve
Dictionary of Theological Terms
Gilgamesh Epic
Gilgamesh EpicAn ancient Babylonian composition recovered from the ruins of the palace library of Assyrian king Ashurbanipal at Nineveh.The Epic describes the exploits of a legendary Sumerian king in the early third millennium B.C. The eleventh tablet records the Babylonian story of the flood. In it
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 2, D–G
Gilgamesh
Gilgamesh gil’guh-mesh. A legendary king of the Sumerian city of Uruk (Erech). Gilgamesh was apparently a historical figure who lived in S Mesopotamia about the end of the 4th or beginning of the 3rd millennium B.C. It was as the great hero and personification of the human condition in the cuneiform
Dictionary of Christianity and Science: The Definitive Reference for the Intersection of Christian Faith and Contemporary Science
Gilgamesh Epic
GILGAMESH EPIC. The Gilgamesh Epic is perhaps the best-known Mesopotamian literary composition today, and it has important connections to the biblical story of the flood, though the account of the flood in Gilgamesh is only an episode within the larger narrative.The Gilgamesh Epic is best known from
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
GILGAMESH, EPIC OF
GILGAMESH, EPIC OF. By far the longest and most famous work of Mesopotamian literature, this epic included twelve tablets in its final Standard Babylonian version. Five Sumerian tales about Gilgamesh, a perhaps historical king in Uruk in the first half of the third millenium, provided the basic material