Loading…
Gemara
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Gemara
Gemara (גְּמָרָא‎, gemara'). Refers to (1) the part of the Talmud that comments on the Mishnah, (2) the Talmud itself, or (3) tradition.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Gemara
GEMARA. Aramaic name for both the Talmud of the Land of Israel (ca. 350–450 c.e.) and the Babylonian Talmud (ca. 550–600 c.e.). These compilations contain a wide variety of supplemental materials organized as a paragraph-by-paragraph commentary on the Mishnah. The term “Gemara” is also used to describe
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Gemara
Gemara. Summary of the important points of rabbinic discussion on the Mishna (the oral tradition). The Gemara and Mishna together form the Talmud (which many Jews consider authoritative for their faith). In Aramaic Gemara means “acquired learning.” That meaning reflects the teaching method of the rabbis,
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Gemara
GEMARA* Summary of the important points of rabbinic discussion on the Mishnah (the oral tradition). The Gemara and Mishnah together form the Talmud (which many Jews consider authoritative for their faith). In Aramaic, Gemara means “acquired learning.” That meaning reflects the teaching method of the
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Gemara
Gemara. A name used of the Rabbinic commentary on the *Mishnah to be found in the *Talmud. The Gemara of the Babylonian Talmud is written in E. Aramaic (a language closely allied to *Syriac), that of the Palestinian Talmud in W. Aramaic.
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Gemara
GEMARA [geh MARE uh] (completion or tradition) — the second part of the Talmud, the source from which the laws that govern orthodox Jews is derived. The Mishnah, the text of Jewish oral law which was written in Hebrew, is the first part of the Talmud. The Gemara, which was written in Aramaic, is a commentary
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Gemara
GEMARA Portion of the Talmud containing commentary on the Mishnah. The word “Gemara” (Aramaic, “to learn”) refers specifically to the discussions on the Mishnah conducted in the rabbinic academies of ancient Palestine and Babylon. The Mishnah and Gemara combined comprise the Talmud. Most of the Gemara
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 2, D–G
Gemara
Gemara guh-mah’ruh (Aram. גְּמָרָא, from גְּמַר, “to finish, know well, memorize [the law]”). This term refers in general to the learning of (Jewish legal) tradition or to the tradition itself. More specifically, it designates that part of the Talmud containing discussions and expositions of the oral
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
GEMARA
GEMARA guh-mah´ruh [גְּמָרָאgemaraʾ]. Rabbinic commentary on the MISHNAH. Mishnah and Gemara combine to make up a tractate of the TALMUD. These commentaries were compiled by rabbis during the two to three centuries following the “publication” of the Mishnah, ca. 200 ce. Not all of the sixty-three tractates