Loading…
Gehenna
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
The Greek word for “hell” used in the New Testament. A transliteration of “Valley of Hinnom” (גֵּי הִנֹּם‎, gey hinnom), a boundary marker between Judah and Benjamin (Josh 15:8; 18:16). Jeremiah began to associate the place-name with God’s divine wrath and judgment (Jer 7:32, 19:6) because Kings Ahaz and Manasseh began sacrificing their children to Molech there (2 Kgs 16:3, 21:6).The term “Gehenna” is primarily used in the Synoptic Gospels as a symbol of future eschatological judgment (Matt 23:33). The term is almost always used by Jesus Himself (except in Jas 3:6), and bears the sense of a place of physical and spiritual torment and destruction (Matt 5:29–30, Jas 3:6; Matt 10:28; Luke 12:5).The Gospel writers based their usage on Jeremiah’s reinterpretation of the sacrifices in the Hinnom Valley and Isaiah’s final prophecy of the undying worm and unquenchable fire (Isa 66:24; compare Mark 9:48).
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Gehenna
Gehenna (γέεννα, geenna). The Greek word for “hell” used in the New Testament. A transliteration of “Valley of Hinnom” (גֵּי הִנֹּם‎, gey hinnom), a boundary marker between Judah and Benjamin (Josh 15:8; 18:16). Jeremiah began to associate the place-name with God’s divine wrath and judgment (Jer 7:32,
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Gehenna (Place)
GEHENNA (PLACE) [Lat Gehenna]. Valley, currently known as the Wadi er-Rababeh, running S-SW of Jerusalem and also a designation for fiery hell, the opposite of the dominion of God and eternal life. The Lat form is derived from the Gk geenna. The Gk is a transcription of the Aram gêhinnām whose Heb
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Gehenna
Gehenna. English transliteration of the Greek form of an Aramaic word which in turn is derived from the Hebrew phrase “the Valley of [the son(s) of] Hinnom.” The name properly designates a deep valley delimiting the territories of the tribes of Benjamin and Judah (Jos 15:8; 18:16). It is commonly identified
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Gehenna
Gehenna gə-henʹnə [Gk. géenna < Aram gêhinnām < Heb. gê-hinnōm—‘valley of Hinnom’ (Josh. 15:8) < gê beně hinnōm—‘valley of the son of Hinnom’ (Josh. 15:8; 18:16; 2 Ch. 28:3; etc.) or ‹gê benhinnōm—‘valley of the sons of Hinnom’ (2 K. 23:10)]. The English transliteration of the Gk. géenna,
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Gehenna
GEHENNA* English transliteration of the Greek form of an Aramaic word, which is derived from the Hebrew phrase “the Valley of [the son(s) of] Hinnom.” The name properly designates a deep valley delimiting the territories of the tribes of Benjamin and Judah (Jos 15:8; 18:16). It is commonly identified
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Gehenna
GEHENNA. The Gr. form of the Heb. gē–hinnom, “valley of Hinnom” (Josh 15:8; 18:16); also called Topheth (2 Kgs 23:10). The form Gaienna occurs in the LXX in Josh 18:16b. The word is used as the metaphorical name of the place of torment of the wicked after the final judgment. The valley was the place
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Gehenna
Gehenna (Gk. géenna; Lat. Gehenn.)The “valley of Hinnom” (from Heb. gê hinnōm), a ravine (Wadi er-Rabâbi) S and SW of Jerusalem, meeting with the Kidron Valley at En-rogel. Early traditions locating the valley in the Wadi Kidron are not satisfactory. The English NT usually translates the Greek term
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Gehenna
Gehenna [gə hĕnˊə] (Gk. géenna). Greek form of Heb. gê hinnōm “valley of Hinnom” (Josh. 15:8), designating the narrow valley south of Jerusalem. The place was infamous during the monarchic period for the practice of child sacrifice by fire (cf. 2 Kgs. 23:10; Jer. 7:31). In the Hellenistic period
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Gehenna
GEHENNA (Hebrew, “Valley of Hinnom” or “Valley of the son of Hinnom”) The valley of the son of Hinnom, south of Jerusalem, identified with the modern Wadi er-Rababeh. It became synonymous with a place of eternal torment and suffering for the damned. The name itself is taken perhaps from the original
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Gehenna
Gehenna (Gk. γέεννα). Lit. ‘the Valley of Hinnom’ (Heb. גֵּי הִנֹּם); the meaning of Hinnom is unknown. It was orig. used purely topographically, prob. for the Wady er-Rabâbi to the SW and S. of Jerusalem, which joined at the SE of the city with the valley of the *Cedron, though it has sometimes (e.g.
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Gehenna
GEHEN´NA (ge-henʹa; Gk. geenna, for the Heb. hinnōm, the “Valley of Hinnom”). A deep, narrow glen to the S of Jerusalem where the Jews offered their children to Molech. The OT renders “valley of the son of Hinnom,” or “Ben Hinnom” (2 Kings 23:10; Jer. 7:31; 19:2–6). In later times it served as a receptacle
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Gehenna
Gehenna(originally Ge bene Hinnom; i.e., “the valley of the sons of Hinnom”), a deep, narrow glen to the south of Jerusalem, where the idolatrous Jews offered their children in sacrifice to Molech (2 Chr. 28:3; 33:6; Jer. 7:31; 19:2–6). This valley afterwards became the common receptacle for all the
Key passages
Mt 5:22

But I say to you that everyone who is angry at his brother will be subject to judgment, and whoever says to his brother, ‘Stupid fool!’ will be subject to the council, and whoever says, ‘Obstinate fool!’ will be subject to fiery hell.

See also