Loading…
Gauls
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A Celtic people from Europe; those who migrated to Asia Minor were known as Galatians.“Galatia” literally means “Gallia of the East”—its inhabitants are called Galli by Roman writers, just as the inhabitants of ancient France are called Galatai by Greek writers.This people group is mentioned in 1 Macc 8:2, but it is unclear whether Judas Maccabeus is referring here to the Gauls of Europe or the Gauls of Asia Minor. Both became finally subject to the Romans at the same time. The Romans conquered Gallia Cisalpina in 191 bc, and defeated Antiochus, king of Asia, in 189 bc.2 Macc 8:20 refers to Asiatic Gauls or Galatians. In the Maccabean period, Galatian mercenaries often hired themselves out to the Asiatic kings.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Gauls
Gauls (Γαλαται, Galatai). A Celtic people from Europe; those who migrated to Asia Minor were known as Galatians.“Galatia” literally means “Gallia of the East”—its inhabitants are called Galli by Roman writers, just as the inhabitants of ancient France are called Galatai by Greek writers.This people
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Gauls
GAULS [Gk Galatai (Γαλαται)]. Var. GALATIANS. Cited in 1 Macc 8:2 as the name of a people who were defeated and brought under subjugation by the Romans and in 2 Macc 8:20 (here usually rendered “Galatians”) as opponents of the Macedonians in Babylonia. It was the Romans who gave them the name by which
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Gauls
Gauls [Gk Galatai]; AV GALATIANS. The people of Galatia (1 Macc. 8:2). Celtic tribes from Gallia (Gaul) first entered Asia in 278 b.c. at the invitation of Nicomedes I of Bithynia. They plundered other peoples extensively until confined within the borders of Galatia by Attalus I of Pergamum ca 232 b.c.
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Gauls
Gauls (Gk. Galátai; Lat. Galli)A people, originally Celts, who invaded both central and western Europe (Cisalpine Gaul) and Greece and Asia Minor (Galatians). If 1 Macc. 8:2 is correct and the Romans both defeated and imposed tribute on them, then the reference would be to Cisalpine Gaul. Rome had
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Gauls
Gauls [gôlz] (Gk. Galatai).* A Celtic people (Lat. Galli) from central and western Europe, specifically the area of modern France and northern Italy. Some segments migrated to Asia Minor in the third century B.C., where they were known subsequently as the Galatians.Although scholars remain divided,
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
GAULS
GAULS<golz> ([Γαλάται, Galatai]): Galatia in Asia Minor is literally the Gallia of the East; its inhabitants are called Galli by Roman writers, just as the inhabitants of ancient France are called Galatai by Greek writers. In some manuscripts in 2 Tim 4:10, eis Gallian is read for eis Galatian. The
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 2, D–G
Gauls
Gauls gawls (from Lat. Galli). An ancient name for the inhabitants of the land area from the Atlantic Ocean to the Rhine River and extending from the English Channel to the Pyrenees and extended W of the Alps. It was applied by the classical peoples to the Germanic tribes of the region. They were subdivided
The Eerdmans Encyclopedia of Early Christian Art and Archaeology, Volumes 1–3
Gaul
GaulA great variety of capital types also characterizes architectural decoration in southwestern Gaul. The capitals of La Daurade in → Toulouse, which were used in decorative wall arcading ca. 400, included chaotic hybrids of Ionic and Corinthianizing c. (fig. 23). The mixture can be compared to Ionic
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Gauls
GAULS, gôlz (Γαλάται, Galátai): Galatia in Asia Minor is literally the Gallia of the East; its inhabitants are called Galli by Rom writers, just as the inhabitants of ancient France are called Galatai by Gr writers. In some MSS in 2 Tim 4:10, eis Gallían is read for eis Galatían. The emigration of the
Encyclopedia of Ancient Christianity
Gaul
GAUL. The first testimony of the *evangelization of Gaul, a “letter of the servants of Christ in pilgrimage at *Vienne and at *Lyons” destined for their brethren of *Asia and of *Phrygia (Eus., HE 5, 1–4), illustrates the difficulties of a small Christian minority, describing the pogrom that occurred
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
GAULS
GAULS gawls [Γαλάται Galatai]. The Gauls were also referred to as Celts in both Latin and Greek. They originated in the Danube River basin and migrated into central and western Europe. In 278–277 bce three tribes numbering about 20,000 people migrated eastward to the central part of Anatolia. They harassed