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Forfeit
Forfeiting Spiritual Rights
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Forfeit
Forfeit [Heb. niphal of qāḏaš—‘be consecrated’ (Dt. 22:9), ḥāram—‘devote to the ban’ (Ezr. 10:8), ḥātāʾ—‘miss’ (Prov. 20:2; Hab. 2:10), taḥaṯ—‘instead of’ (2 K. 10:24); Gk. apóllymi—‘destroy’ (Lk. 9:25), pass of zēmióō—‘inflict injury or punishment’ (Bauer, rev, p. 338; Lk. 9:25 par)];
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
FORFEIT
FORFEIT<for’-fit> ([חָרַם‎, charam]): “Forfeit” (from forisfacere, “to act beyond”) implies loss through transgression or non-observance of some law or rule. The word occurs only once as the translation of charam, “to shut in,” frequently to devote or consecrate a person or thing to God beyond
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 2, D–G
Forfeit
forfeit. To surrender, or be deprived of, the right to something. This English verb is used a few times in Bible versions, for example, “he who angers him [the king] forfeits his life” (Prov. 20:2, rendering Heb. ḥāṭāʾ H3148, “to sin, incur guilt”; cf. Hab. 2:10). Especially well known is Jesus’
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Forfeit
FORFEIT, fôr′fit (חָרַם‎, ḥāram): “Forfeit” (from forisfacere, “to act beyond”) implies loss through transgression or non-observance of some law or rule. The word occurs only once as the tr of ḥāram, “to shut in,” frequently to devote or consecrate a person or thing to God beyond redemption (cf Lev