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Footstool
Household Objects
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Footstool
Footstool. Low stool used to support one’s feet. Part of King Solomon’s great revenue of gold was used to fashion a footstool for his ivory throne (2 Chr 9:18). Both the ark of the covenant and the temple are referred to as God’s footstool because they were places where God rested (his glory resided
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Footstool
Footstool [Heb. keḇeš (2 Ch. 9:18), haḏôm reg̱el (1 Ch. 28:2; Ps. 99:5; 110:1; 132:7; Isa. 66:1; Lam. 2:1); Gk. hypopódion tó̄n podó̄n (Mt. 5:35; Acts 7:49)]. Of the nine RSV references, only one is literal in nature (2 Ch. 9:18), describing the golden footstool of Solomon’s throne. In 1 Ch.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Footstool
FOOTSTOOL Low stool used to support one’s feet. Part of King Solomon’s great revenue of gold was used to fashion a footstool for his ivory throne (2 Chr 9:18). The word is frequently used metaphorically. Both the ark of the covenant and the temple are referred to as God’s footstool because they were
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Footstool
footstool. The only literal footstool in the Bible is part of a royal throne: Solomon’s ivory throne had “six steps and a footstool of gold, which were attached to the throne” (see 2 Chron. 9:18). The term is usually used figuratively. Thus, God promises to make vanquished enemies the “footstool” of
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Footstool
FOOTSTOOL. Heb. kebesh, translated “footstool,” simply means that which is walked or stepped on, hence a stool, literally, “a stool of the foot” (Heb. hădôm regel). In the description of Solomon’s throne it is said that “there were six steps to the throne, with a footstool of gold” (2 Chr 9:18).Footstool
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Footstool
FOOTSTOOL. The word occurs seven times in the OT, but on only one occasion is it used in a literal sense (2 Ch. 9:18), and there a different word (keḇeš)is used; on the other six occasions haḏōm raḡlayim, ‘stool of the feet’, is used. The equivalent in the NT (hypopodion tōn podōn, ‘footstool
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Footstool
FOOTSTOOL (Heb. kebesh, sometimes “trodden” upon). An article of furniture used to support the feet when sitting in state, as upon a throne (2 Chron. 9:18). The divine glory that resided symbolically between the cherubim above the Ark of the Covenant is supposed to use the Ark as a footstool (1 Chron.
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Footstool
Footstoolconnected with a throne (2 Chr. 9:18). Jehovah symbolically dwelt in the holy place between the cherubim above the ark of the covenant. The ark was his footstool (1 Chr. 28:2; Ps. 99:5; 132:7). And as heaven is God’s throne, so the earth is his footstool (Ps. 110:1; Isa. 66:1; Matt. 5:35).
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Footstool
Footstoolfootstool, a royal symbol (see 2 Chron. 9:18), most often used figuratively for the Ark (1 Chron. 28:2), the Temple (see Isa. 60:13), or even Zion (Lam. 2:1). Elsewhere and in response to this view, the entire earth is described as God’s footstool (Isa. 66:1; cf. Matt. 5:35; Acts 7:49). The
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Footstool
FOOTSTOOL - a piece of furniture for resting a person’s feet. The word is often used symbolically in the Bible to signify God’s promise to Israel to "make (the Lord’s) enemies his footstool" (Ps. 110:1). This messianic promise is repeated six times in the New Testament (Matt. 22:44; Mark 12:36; Luke
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
FOOTSTOOL
FOOTSTOOL<foot’-stool> ([כֶּבֶשׂ‎, kebhes]; [ὑποπόδιον, hupopodion], “trodden on”): The 15 Scripture references to this term may be classified as literal or figurative. Of the former are the two passages: 2 Ch 9:18 and Jas 2:3. In these the footstool was a sort of step or support for the feet
A Dictionary of Christ and the Gospels: Aaron–Zion
Footstool
FOOTSTOOL (ὑποπόδιον).—With the single exception of Ja 2:3 the word is used figuratively in the NT, to express the idea of ‘subjection’ or ‘complete control.’ In this sense it occurs frequently in the Gospels: e.g. Mt 22:44, Mk 12:36, Lk 20:43, where the Synoptists record Christ’s quotation from Ps