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Fleshpot
Flesh Pot • Flesh-Pot • Fleshpots • Pots of Meat
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Fleshpot
Fleshpot [Heb. sîr habbāśār—‘kettle of meat’]. One of the six kinds of cooking utensils spoken of as pots, pans, caldrons, or basins. These were probably made of bronze or earthenware. The only mention of fleshpots, specifically so named, is in Ex. 16:3, where the discontent Israelites recall the
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Flesh Pot
FLESH POT. These were pots which the Israelite slaves had used in Egypt in cooking meats (Ex 16:3). No details are given of the material or size. One of the uses of the sir, a rather general term for “pot,” was for boiling meats and vegetables (e.g., 2 Kgs 4:38–41; Jer 1:13; Ezk 11:3, 7, 11- “caldron”;
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Fleshpots
FLESHPOTS (Heb. sîr, probably a foreign loan-word; cf. Arab. sîr, ‘a large waterjar’, and later Gk. siras). A large household utensil usually made of metal for placing over a fire (Ex 16:3; Ec. 7:6, ‘pot’; 2 Ki. 4:38, ‘great pot’). It is used symbolically of Jerusalem (Ezk. 11:3, ‘cauldron’), in similes
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Pots of Meat
POTS OF MEAT. The pots referred to by this expression in the NASB and NIV are more familiarly known by the KJV term flesh pots (Ex. 16:3). They were probably three-legged bronze vessels used for culinary purposes by the Egyptians, such as are represented in the paintings of the tombs.
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Flesh Pot
FLESH POT - KJV words for a large metal pot used for boiling water or cooking meat (Ex. 16:3; pots of meat, NKJV). These were used by the Hebrews during their years of slavery in Egypt.
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
FLESH-POT
FLESH-POT<flesh’-pot> ([סִיר הַבָּשָׂר‎, cir ha-basar], “pot of the flesh”): One of the six kinds of cooking utensils spoken of as pots or pans or caldrons or basins. Probably usually made of bronze or earthenware. The only mention of flesh-pots, specifically so named, is in Ex 16:3.See FOOD.
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Fleshpot
FLESHPOT Kettle used for cooking meat. The murmuring of the Israelites against Moses (Exod. 16:3) included the exaggerated claim that they customarily relaxed by the fleshpots in Egypt and had more than enough bread. In the ancient Near East meat was not part of the common people’s regular diet.
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 2, D–G
Flesh Pot
flesh pot. This term is used by the KJV once in a passage where the Israelites complain that, when living in Egypt, they used to sit around pots of meat eating whatever they wanted (Exod. 16:3). These pots (Heb. sîr H6105) were large metal kettles used not only for cooking meat (2 Ki. 4:38; Ezek. 11:3),
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Flesh-Pot
FLESH-POT, flesh′pot (סִיר הַבָּשָׂר‎, ṣīr ha-bāsār, “pot of the flesh”): One of the six kinds of cooking utensils spoken of as pots or pans or caldrons or basins. Probably usually made of bronze or earthenware. The only mention of flesh-pots, specifically so named, is in Ex 16:3. See Food.
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
FLESHPOT
FLESHPOT [סִיר הַבָּשָׂרsir habbasar]. The Hebrew word sir can denote a POT, CALDRON, or KETTLE, any vessel used for cooking, washing, and ritual purposes. In Exod 16:3, the Israelites speak of the “fleshpots” (NRSV) from which they ate in Egypt before their wandering in the wilderness. See COOKING
Key passages
Ex 16:3

And the Israelites said to them, “If only we had died by the hand of Yahweh in the land of Egypt, when we sat by the pots of meat, when we ate bread until we were full, because you have brought us out to this desert to kill all of this assembly with hunger.”

See also
Topics & Themes