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Festus
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Porcius Festus
Porcius Festus (Πόρκιος Φῆστος, Porkios Phēstos). Governor of Judaea while Paul was imprisoned in Caesarea. Festus heard Paul testify several times before sending him to Rome (Acts 25–26).
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Festus, Porcius (Person)
FESTUS, PORCIUS (PERSON) [Gk Phestos (Φεστος)]. Procurator of Judea (ca. 59–62 c.e.) who heard Paul’s case with dispatch and, after consulting with Agrippa II, granted Paul’s request to be sent to Rome for trial (Acts 24:27–26:32). Festus is known to us only from Josephus and the Acts of the Apostles.
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Festus, Porcius
Festus, Porcius. Roman procurator (governor) of Judea, who succeeded Felix Antonius and who was succeeded by Albinus. The precise date of Porcius Festus’ accession to power is debatable but has been narrowed to sometime between ad 55 and 60. The only sources mentioning Festus are the Book of Acts and
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Festus
Festus fesʹtəs, PORCIUS pôrʹshəs [Gk. Porkios Phēstos]. The Roman governor or procurator who succeeded Felix Antonius in the province of Judea (Acts 24:27). The only sources of information concerning Festus are the NT and Josephus.Josephus’ writings picture Festus as a prudent and honorable governor.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Festus, Porcius
FESTUS, PORCIUS Roman procurator (governor) of Judea, who succeeded Felix Antonius and who was succeeded by Albinus. The precise date of Porcius Festus’s accession to power is debatable but has been narrowed to sometime between ad 55 and 60. The only sources mentioning Festus are the book of Acts and
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Festus, Porcius
Festus, Porcius (fes´tuhs, pohr´shuhs), the Roman procurator over Judea who replaced Antonius Felix (ca. 59 ce). According to the historian Josephus, he was a competent public official. He died in office several years after his appointment. According to Acts 25:1–26:32, Festus encountered Paul, a prisoner
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Festus, Porcius
FESTUS, PORCIUS. The successor to Antonius Felix as procurator of Judea under Nero. According to E. Schurer, he was unable to undo the damage done by his predecessor, although he himself was disposed to rule well. Josephus (Ant. xx. 8.9–11) presents Festus as a wise and just official, an agreeable contrast
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Festus
FESTUS. Porcius Festus succeeded *Felix as procurator of Judaea. Nothing is known of his life before his appointment, and he died in office after about 2 years. In Josephus (Ant. 20.182ff. and BJ 2.271) he makes an agreeable contrast with his predecessor Felix and his successor Albinus. In Acts (24:27–26:32)
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Festus, Porcius
Festus, Porcius (Gk. Pórkios Phḗstos)The governor (procurator) of the Roman province of Judea ca. 59 to 62 c.e. Festus is mentioned in connection with the decision to send Paul to Rome for formal trial (Acts 24–26). When Jewish leaders presented charges against Paul, at first Festus refused to send
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Festus, Porcius
Festus, Porcius [pôrˊshəs fĕsˊtəs] (Gk. Porkios Phēstos).† The Roman procurator of Judea who succeeded Antonius Felix. According to Josephus (Ant. xx.8.9–11), his administration was more efficient and more sensitive to the Jewish constituents than that of his predecessor, and he succeeded in
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Festus, Porcius
FESTUS, PORCIUS Procurator of Judea from around a.d. 60 to 62, although the exact dates are uncertain. Successor to Marcus Felix, he is best known for presiding over Paul’s case. Virtually nothing is known about him outside of what was recorded by Josephus and in the Acts of the Apostles. Josephus had
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Festus Porcius
Fes´tus, Por´cius (Festus means festival), successor of Felix as procurator of Judea, Acts 24:27, sent by Nero probably in the autumn of a.d. 60. A few weeks after Festus reached his province he heard the cause of St. Paul, who had been left a prisoner by Felix, in the presence of Herod Agrippa II and