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Eye salve
Occupational Objects
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Salve
Salve [Gk. kollýrion] (Rev. 3:18); AV EYE SALVE; NEB OINTMENT. A medical compound applied to the eyes (cf. Lat collyrium in Horace Satires i.5.30and Heb. qîlûrîṯ in rabbinic literature). Rev. 3:18 may be alluding figuratively to the Phrygian powder that was used by Laodicea’s famous medical school
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Eyesalve
EYESALVE. The medicine or powder referred in Rev 3:18 was a compound of ingredients applied to the eyelids to strengthen the eyes. The medical school at Laodicea was famous for this preparation and its usage, according to Galen. The blindness of the Laodicean church was spiritual, however, and the intent
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Salve
Salve (Gk. kolloúrion).* A medicinal powder applied as a paste to the eyes (Rev. 3:18; KJV “eyesalve”). Laodicea was known for its medical school and was, indeed, where some eye salve was manufactured. There is, therefore, some irony in the counsel to the Laodicean Christians that they purchase
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Eye Salve
EYE SALVE (Gk. kollourion, diminutive of kollura, coarse bread of cylindrical shape). A preparation shaped like a kollura, composed of various materials and used as a remedy for tender eyelids (Rev. 3:18).
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Eye Salve
EYE SALVE — an ointment of various compounds applied to the eyelids for medicinal purposes (Rev. 3:18). This salve was mentioned by John in the Book of Revelation in his message to the church at Laodicea. The medical school at Laodicea was famous for its eye salve; so to make his point that the Laodiceans
Salve
SALVE — a medical ointment used to soothe the eyes (Rev. 3:18; ointment, REB; eyesalve, KJV, NASB). A popular eye medicine known as “Phrygian powder” was one of Laodicea’s sources of wealth. The medical school at Laodicea was famous for the preparation and use of this eye salve. The lukewarm church at
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
EYESALVE
EYESALVE<i’-sav> ([κολλούριον, kollourion]; collyrium; Revelation 3:18): A Phrygian powder mentioned by Galen, for which the medical school of Laodicea seems to have been famous (see Ramsay, The Letters to the Seven Churches of Asia), but the figurative reference is to the restoring of spiritual
Dictionary of Phrase and Fable
Salve (1)
Salve (1 syl.) is the Latin sal′via (sage), one of the most efficient of mediæval remedies.“To other woundes, and to broken armes,Some hadde salve, and some hadde charmes.”Chaucer: Canterbury Tales, line 2,715.Salve. To flatter, to wheedle. The allusion is to salving a wound.
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 2, D–G
Eyesalve
eyesalve. This term is used by the KJV to render Greek kollourion G3141 (a diminutive of kollyra, “little cake”), which appears in the context of the address to the church at Laodicea (Rev. 3:18 [NIV simply, “salve”]; many mss have the variant spelling kollyrion). Some scholars have seen a connection
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Eyesalve
EYESALVE, īʹsäv (κολλούριον, kolloúrion; collyrium; Rev 3:18): A Phrygian powder mentioned by Galen, for which the medical school of Laodicea seems to have been famous (see Ramsay, The Letters to the Seven Churches of Asia), but the figurative reference is to the restoring of spiritual vision.
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
SALVE
SALVE [κολλούριον kollourion]. A medicated ointment to soothe the eyes and used by the Greeks and Romans. The word collyrium refers to a variety of solid medicines made into cakes, held together by gum, and dissolved in liquid before being applied to the eyes. Salve functions as a metaphor for cleared
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