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Expiation
Expiate
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Expiation
Expiation. Atonement, purification, or removal of sin or its guilt. The term occurs in some English translations for kjv “reconciliation” (Heb 2:17) or “propitiation” (Rom 3:25; 1 Jn 2:2; 4:10). “Expiation” also appears in some English translations of some OT passages (Nm 35:33; Dt 32:43; 1 Sm 3:14;
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Expiate;Expiation
Expiate; Expiation [Heb. kipper, kippurîm, kappōreṯ, kōp̱er; Gk. hiláskomai, exiláskomai, hilasmós, hilasté̄rion].In the OT the NEB renders Heb. kipper most often by “make expiation,” but also by “(secure) pardon,” “blot out,” “wipe away,” “purge.” In place of “expiate” the AV and RSV prefer
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Expiation
EXPIATION* Atonement, purification, or removal of sin or its guilt. The term occurs in some English translations (such as asv, erv) for “reconciliation” (Heb 2:17) or “propitiation” (Rom 3:25; 1 Jn 2:2; 4:10). “Expiation” also appears in some English translations of some OT passages (Nm 35:33; Dt 32:43;
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Expiate, Expiation
EXPIATE, EXPIATION. These terms are used in the RSV for Heb. ḥaṭṭā’t (Num 8:7, “water of expiation”) and kāphar (Num 35:33; Deut 32:43; 1 Sam 3:14; 2 Sam 21:3; Isa 27:9; 47:11) and for Gr. hilastērion (Rom 3:25), hilaskomai (Heb 2:17) and hilasmos (1 Jn 2:2; 4:10).The basic idea of expiation has
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Expiation
EXPIATION. This term does not occur in av, but it is found in some modern translations in place of ‘propitiation’, e.g. 1 Jn. 4:10, rsv. Objection is made to ‘propitiation’ on the ground that it means the appeasement of an angry God, an idea not found in Scripture. Therefore expiation is substituted
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Expiation
ExpiationA sacrificelike action that removes a barrier of sin which blocks fellowship between God and people. Expiatory concepts are closely linked with ideas of guilt, purity, divine judgment, and mercy. OT and NT ideas about expiation are further linked with broad patterns of sacrificial thinking
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Expiation
Expiation. †The restoration of the relationship between God and human beings through some act of atonement. In the Old Testament Heb. kāp̱ar (usually in the piel) is a frequently-used term (“cover, appease, atone”) sometimes translated “make expiation” in the RSV. Expiation of the sins of the
Dictionary of Paul and His Letters
Expiation
Expiation, propitiation, mercy seatThese are three translations, each having different connotations, of one Greek word, hilastērion. Paul uses it in Romans 3:25 with reference to the crucified Christ “whom God put forth [as] hilastērion.” Which of the three translations best reflects the interpretation
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
expiation
expiation. The atoning or making up for an offence committed against God or one’s neighbour. Christianity claims that the only sufficient expiation of human sin is the offering made by Jesus Christ of His earthly life and death, and that of this offering the merits are infinite. Acc. to Catholic theology,
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Expiation
EXPIATION. In the theological sense, this term denotes the end accomplished by certain divinely appointed sacrifices in respect to freeing the sinner from the punishment of his sins. The sacrifices recognized as expiatory are the sin offerings of the OT dispensation (see Offering; Sacrifice), and, preeminently,
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Expiation
ExpiationGuilt is said to be expiated when it is visited with punishment falling on a substitute. Expiation is made for our sins when they are punished not in ourselves but in another who consents to stand in our room. It is that by which reconciliation is effected. Sin is thus said to be “covered”
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Expiation
Expiationexpiation, a term associated with the removal, cleansing, or forgiveness of sin; it is often confused with ‘propitiation’ (cf. Rom. 3:25; 1 John 2:2; 4:10 [kjv: ‘propitiation’; rsv: ‘expiation’]). Both terms create confusion for many modern readers because of their infrequent occurrence in
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Topics & Themes