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Examination
Analysis • Consider • Deliberation • Examine • Make Examination • Scrutiny • Self-examination
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Examine;Make Examination
Examine; Make Examination [Heb. rāʾâ (Lev. 13:3; 14:3; etc.), ḥāqar (Prov. 18:17; Lam. 3:40), tûr (Eccl. 9:1), dāraš (Ezr. 10:16), bîn (Jer. 2:10); Gk. dokimázō (Lk. 14:19; 1 Cor. 11:28), anakrínō (Lk. 23:14; Acts 4:9; 12:19; 17:11; 24:8; 25:26; 28:18; 1 Cor. 9:3), anetázō (Acts 22:24,
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
scrutiny
scrutiny (Lat. scrutinium). A term applied to the formal testing of *catechumens before their Baptism in the early Church. The 1972 RC Order for Adult Baptism includes three ‘scrutinies’ of catechumens; these comprise a homily, prayers, and laying on of hands, and take place after the *Gospel at
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
EXAMINE; EXAMINATION
EXAMINE; EXAMINATION<eg-zam’-in>, <eg-zam-i-na’-shun>: [דָּרַשׁ‎, darash], “to follow,” “inquire,” “make inquisition” (Ezra 10:16); and [בָּחַן‎, bachan], “to test,” “investigate,” “prove,” “tempt” (Psalm 26:2). The former was the judicial term. [ἀνακρίνω, anakrino], “scrutinize,”
CONSIDER
CONSIDER<kon-sid’-er>: In the New Testament the force of the word is brought out most vividly in Matthew 6:26 ([καταμανθάνω, katamanthano]), where it means to “examine closely,” as though the observer had to bend down for this purpose, and in Luke 12:27; Hebrews 10:24 (katanoeo, to “observe
A Catholic Dictionary
Scrutiny
scrutiny (scrutinium). An examination of those who were about to receive baptism as to their faith and dispositions. They were taught the Creed and the Lord’s Prayer, exorcised, &c., during those scrutinies. The days appointed for the different scrutinies varied in different places. At Rome the Creed
Compton’s Encyclopedia
College-entrance examination
College-entrance examinationtest given by many colleges and universities, usually to high school students, as a requirement for admission; normally covers language ability, mathematics, reading, and science; some nations have identical tests for all students that determine level of higher education
A Dictionary of Christ and the Gospels: Aaron–Zion
Self-Examination
SELF-EXAMINATION.—‘Our conclusion, then, is that the state of mind which is now most naturally expressed by the unspoken questions, Have I been what I should be? Shall I be what I should be, in doing so and so? is that in which all moral progress originates’ (T. H. Green, Prolegomena to Ethics, p. 337).
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Examine, Examination
EXAMINE, eg-zamʹin, EXAMINATION, eg-zam-i-nāʹshun: דָּרַש‎, dārash, “to follow,” “inquire,” “make inquisition” (Ezr 10:16); and בָּחַן‎, bāḥan, “to test,” “investigate,” “prove,” “tempt” (Ps 26:2). The former was the judicial term. ἀνακρίνω, anakrínō, “scrutinize,” “investigate,” “interrogate” (in
Consider
CONSIDER, kon-sidʹēr: In the NT the force of the word is brought out most vividly in Mt 6:26 (καταμανθάνω, katamanthánō), where it means to “examine closely,” as though the observer had to bend down for this purpose, and in Lk 12:27; He 10:24 (katanoéō, to “observe well”), while in He 13:7 the anatheōréō,