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Evil-doing
Evildoer • Malefactor • Malefactors
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Evil-doing
Evil-doing [Heb. ráʿâ] (1 S. 25:39; Prov. 14:32; Eccl. 7:15); AV WICKEDNESS; NEB WICKEDNESS, WRONGDOING; EVILDOER [Heb. ʿāśâ rāʿâ (2 S. 3:39; Ps. 34:16 [MT 17]), rāʿ (Ps. 10:15), ʿāśâ rišʿâ (Mal. 3:15; 4:1 [MT 3:19]), rāʿaʿ (Ps. 22:16 [MT 17]; 27:2; Prov. 24:19; Isa. 1:4; 9:17 [MT 16];
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Evildoer
EVILDOER. In the Heb. the word is the participial form of a verb meaning “to break or to break into pieces.” Hence an evildoer is one who breaks into pieces, destroys, makes evil whatever he does, acts wickedly, and afflicts others. Thus in Ps 26:5; 37:1, 9; Isa 1:4, and other passages, the writers are
Malefactor
MALEFACTOR. Two Gr. words are used in Scripture: kakopoios, “a bad doer,” i.e., evildoer, criminal (Jn 18:30; 1 Pet 2:12, 14; 3:16–17; 4:15), and kakourgos, “a wrongdoer” (Lk 23:32–33, 39; 2 Tim 2:9). “The former describes the subject as doing or making evil; the latter as creating or originating the
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Malefactor
Malefactormalefactor, a term in the kjv for ‘evil doer’ (John 18:30; Prov. 24:19), ‘wrong doer’ (1 Pet. 2:12; 4:14), and ‘criminal’ (Luke 23:32–33; 2 Tim. 2:9).
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Malefactor
MALEFACTOR — KJV translation of two Greek words meaning “evildoer” (John 18:30) and “evil worker” (Luke 23:32–33, 39). The two thieves crucified with Jesus were malefactors. (Luke 23:32–33, 39; criminals, NKJV, NIV).
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
MALEFACTOR
MALEFACTOR<mal-e-fak’-ter> ([κακοποιός, kakopoios], “a bad doer,” i.e. “evildoer,” “criminal”; [κακου̂ργος, akourgos], “a wrongdoer”): The former occurs in Jn 18:30 the King James Version, the latter, which is the stronger term, in Lk 23:32, 39. The former describes the subject as doing
A Dictionary of Christ and the Gospels: Aaron–Zion
Malefactor
MALEFACTOR.—Two Gr. words, whose shades of meaning are indistinguishable, are thus translated in NT: (1) κακοποιός or κακὸν ποιῶν (lit. ‘evil-doer’), Jn 18:30, 1 P 2:12, 14, 4:15; (2) κακοῦργος (lit. ‘evil-worker’), Lk 23:32, 33, 39, 2 Ti 2:9. AV renders κακοποιός ‘malefactor’ in Jn 18:30, ‘evil-doer’
Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Malefactors
MALEFACTORS Used in KJV to denote the two criminals who were crucified beside Jesus (Luke 23:32–33, 39). The word is the Latin translation of the Greek kakourgos, meaning “robber” or “criminal.” The Latin means “evildoer.”
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Malefactor
MALEFACTOR, mal-ē̇-fakʹtẽr (κακοποιός, kakopoiós, “a bad doer,” i.e. “evildoer.” “criminal”; κακοῦργος, kakoúrgos, “a wrongdoer”): The former occurs in Jn 18:30 AV, the latter, which is the stronger term, in Lk 23:32, 39. The former describes the subject as doing or making evil, the latter as creating
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Topics & Themes