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Ethnarch
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Ethnarch
Ethnarch (ἐθνάρχης, ethnarchēs). An official who ruled as a governor under a king, usually over an entire province. Simon Maccabeus was made ethnarch of the Jews, according to the book of 1 Maccabees (1 Macc 14:47; 15:1–2).
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Ethnarch
ETHNARCH [Gk Ethnarchēs (Ἐθναρχης)]. See PALESTINE, ADMINISTRATION OF (ROMAN ADMINISTRATION).
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Ethnarch
ETHNARCH Title given to one who rules by the authority of another country. Ethnarch was a position below a king but above a tetrarch or governor. Three ethnarchs who ruled in Palestine were Simon, during the Maccabean period (1 Macc 14:47), Archelaus in the time of Jesus (Mt 2:22), and one in Damascus
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Ethnarch
ethnarch (eth´nahrk; Gk., “leader/ruler of a people”), a title for a political ruler used during the Hasmonean and Roman periods. The exact meaning remains unclear, but it occurs only in 1 Maccabees, where it is applied to Simon Maccabeus (14:47; 15:1–2). Perhaps it was a title given to rulers over their
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Ethnarch
ETHNARCH. The Gr. term ethnarchēs, a governor of an ethnic group, occurs in 2 Cor 11:32, the “governor” of Damascus under the Nabataean king Aretas IV. “Ethnarch” was apparently a title of royalty granted to a dependent ruler, higher than tetrarch but lower than “king.” Herod’s son Archelaus was given
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Ethnarch
ETHNARCH (Gk. ethnarchēs, ‘governor’, 2 Cor. 11:32). An officer in charge of Damascus with a garrison under *Aretas IV, king of Arabia Petraea (9 bc–ad 39), who was encouraged by the Jews to arrest Paul after his conversion (cf. Acts 9:24–25). Damascus in 64 bc became part of the Rom. province of Syria.
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Ethnarch
Ethnarch (Gk. ethnárchēs)A political title (lit., “ruler of the people”) most commonly designating either a dependent monarch (1 Macc. 14:47; 15:1–2) or the leader of the semi-autonomous Jewish community in Alexandria (Josephus Ant. 14.7.2). Additional meanings have been proposed for the unnamed ethnarch
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Ethnarch
Ethnarch [ĕthˊnärk] (Gk. ethnárchēs “ruler of the people,” from éthnos “people” and árchōn “ruler”). A title given to an official lesser than an independent king but superior to a Tetrarch; a governor or ruler of a province.According to 1 Macc. 14:47 Simon Maccabeus was granted the title
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Ethnarch
EthnarchEthnarch (ethʹnahrk), a title whose Greek etymology (‘leader’ or ‘ruler of a people’) is clear but whose application and significance in the Hasmonean and Roman periods remain unclear. It occurs only once in the nt (2 Cor. 11:32), where the rsv, tev, and niv render it ‘governor.’ From other
Ecclesiastical Dictionary: Containing, in Concise Form, Information upon Ecclesiastical, Biblical, Archæological, and Historical Subjects
Ethnarch
Ethnarch.—A ruler who, though not independent, yet governed his people according to their national laws. The term was given to the Jewish ruler Simon (1 Mach. 14:47) and his son Hyrcanus. In 2 Cor. 11:32, the deputy of Aretas the king was called the “ethnarch,”—in the English version “governor.”
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 2, D–G
Ethnarch
ethnarch eth’nahrk (ἐθνάρχης G1617, from ἔνος, “a body of people,” and ἄρχω, “to rule”). The Greek term appears after the Hellenistic expansion under Alexander the Great and has various meanings. Usually it was the title of a governor of a town or county who ruled for an overlord of a different
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
ETHNARCH
ETHNARCH eth´nahrk [ἐθνάρχης ethnarchēs]. An official or dependent ruler. The exact meaning can vary because the title could cover a range of responsibilities related to the governance of an ethnic group or a subservient nation. The title could refer to an overseer of ethnic affairs in a large city,