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Ethiopic Versions
Ethiopic Version
Dictionaries
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Ethiopic Versions of the Bible
Ethiopic Versions of the Bible. Bible translation into Ethiopic (Ge˓ez) prob. began in the 4th-5th cent., basically from Greek, but with some influence from Syriac and possibly also Hebrew. From the 14th cent. there were revisions based on *Arabic texts. Almost all Ethiopic biblical MSS date from
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
ETHIOPIC VERSIONS
ETHIOPIC VERSIONS<e-thi-op’-ik vur’-shuns>: Christianity was introduced into Abyssinia by Tyrian missionaries, who probably spoke Greek, about the time of Constantine the Great. The Bible was translated into Ethiopic, or, to use the native name, Ge`ez, the Old Testament being from the Septuagint, between
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Ethiopic Versions
ETHIOPIC VERSIONS, ē-thi-opʹik vûrʹshuns: Christianity was introduced into Abyssinia by Tyrian missionaries, who probably spoke Gr, about the time of Constantine the Great. The Bible was trd into Ethiopic, or, to use the native name, Lesāna Ge‛ez, the OT being from the LXX, between the 4th and 5th
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
I. Ethiopic
I. EthiopicThe Aksumite kingdom adopted Christianity in the 4th cent. and inscriptional evidence indicates the existence of biblical translation by the early 6th cent. However, the bulk of biblical manuscripts comes from the 16th cent. onward, and the dates of some of the earliest biblical manuscripts
VERSION, ETHIOPIC
VERSION, ETHIOPIC ee´thee-op´ik. An ancient version of the Bible that was translated from Greek (and possibly Syriac) between the 4th and 7th cent. ce and represents a mixture of Byzantine and Western text traditions. The oldest surviving manuscripts date to the 13th cent. See VERSIONS, ANCIENT.