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Ethiopic Language
Ethiopic • Languages of the ANE
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Ethiopic
Ethiopic ē-thi-op:k (Eth lesāna Geʿez—‘the tongue of Geʿez’]. The language of Ethiopia, used in the inscriptions of the kings of the ancient Aksumite (Axumite) empire and in most of the literature of Christian Ethiopia. The Agʿazyan or “Geʿez” tribe must have dwelt in or near Aksum (Axum) in antiquity.
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Ethiopic
EthiopicClassical Ethiopic (Geʿez), the oldest attested member of Ethiopic Semitic, a family of about a dozen Semitic languages spoken in Eritrea and the Ethiopian highlands. Ethiopic Semitic is presumably derived from one or more forms of South Semitic brought from Yemen, probably in the first half
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Ethiopic
Ethiopic [ēˊthĭ ŏpˊĭk] (Eth. lesāna Ge˓ez “the tongue of Ge˓ez”).* The classical language of Ethiopia (Abyssinia); called Ge˓ez, from Ag˓azyan, a tribe from the region of Aksum, the ancient capital. A derivative of Old South Arabic, it was introduced into Abyssinia during the first millennium
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
ETHIOPIC LANGUAGE
ETHIOPIC LANGUAGE<e-thi-op’-ik lan’-gwaj>: The language commonly called Ethiopic is the language in which the inscriptions of the kings of the ancient Aksumitic (Axumite) empire and most of the literature of Christian Abyssinia are written. It is called lesana Ge`ez, “the tongue of Ge`ez,” by the
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 3, H–L
Languages of the Ane
languages of the ANE. Those languages of the ANE that have left behind many documents on clay, stone, papyrus, or even parchment are fairly few in number, and are for the most part well known. There were dozens of other languages and dialects spoken by the various nationalities and tribes of this region
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Ethiopic Language
ETHIOPIC LANGUAGE, ē-thi-opʹik laṇʹgwāj: The language commonly called Ethiopic is the language in which the inscriptions of the kings of the ancient Aksumitic (Axumite) empire and most of the lit. of Christian Abyssinia are written. It is called lesāna Geʽez, “the tongue of Geʽez,” by the Abyssinians