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Epistle to the Romans
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
The longest and—since the Reformation—most theologically controversial of Paul’s letters. Romans often is regarded as Paul’s fullest expression of his theology, with key passages addressing many overlapping themes, including:sin and judgment (1:18–3:20; 7:7–25);righteousness (3:1–4:12; 5:17–21; 6:15–20; 9:30–10:13);salvation (3:21–26; 5:1–11; 6:1–7:6; 8:1–39);faith (3:21–4:25);• the death and resurrection of Christ (3:21–26; 5:6–21; 6:1–11; 8:1–4);• the law (3:27–4:25; 7:7–25);• the Holy Spirit (8:1–27);• the role and status of Israel (9:1–11:36); and• obedience and self-sacrificial love (12:1–15:13).Romans most likely was written during the mid- to late ad 50s and was sent from Corinth. Most scholars contend that the churches in Rome that received the letter were predominantly Gentile with a Jewish minority, although the ethnic composition is a key point of debate (see below: “Recipients”). Other scholarly topics include Paul’s reason for writing Romans (see below: “Purpose”), the letter’s original form (see below: “Integrity of the Letter”), and its support for the doctrine of justification by faith (see below: “Ongoing Debate over Justification in Romans”).
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Romans, Letter to the
Romans, Letter to the The longest and—since the Reformation—most theologically controversial of Paul’s letters. Romans often is regarded as Paul’s fullest expression of his theology, with key passages addressing many overlapping themes, including:sin and judgment (1:18–3:20; 7:7–25);righteousness
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Romans, Letter to the
ROMANS, LETTER TO THEPreviewAuthorDate, Origin, and DestinationBackgroundAudiencePurpose and Theological TeachingContentAuthor Written in the first person (Rom 1:5, 10, etc.), this epistle was authored by the apostle Paul. (The first words of the first verse are “Paul, a slave of Christ
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Romans, Letter of Paul to The
Romans, Letter of Paul to the, the sixth book of the nt and the first in a series of thirteen letters attributed to Paul. It is the longest of Paul’s letters and is often regarded as the most important from a theological standpoint.Contents: The letter begins with Paul greeting the Romans (1:1–7), giving
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Romans, Epistle to the (Writing)
ROMANS, EPISTLE TO THE. By common consent this is the most important of Paul’s writings from the theological standpoint. Its exposition of salvation is broad in its sweep and detailed in its application.Founding of the ChurchThe beginnings of gospel testimony in the capital of the empire are veiled
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Romans, Letter to The
Romans, Letter to theThe longest of Paul’s epistles, placed in most Bibles at the head of the Pauline corpus. It has had enormous influence, attracting such commentators as Origen, Thomas Aquinas, Philip Melanchthon, John Calvin, and Karl Barth. Romans was decisive in the life and thought of Augustine
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Romans, Letter to the (Writing)
Romans, Letter to the. †The sixth book of the New Testament, and the longest of Paul’s letters. Romans has become for the Church the Bible’s most comprehensive guide to the structure of the Christian faith. As such it has often stood behind renewals of life and thought in the Church, including those
Dictionary of Paul and His Letters
Romans, Letter to The
Romans, letter to theRomans is both the least controversial of the major NT letters and the most important. Least controversial, at any rate, in the “who wrote what when to whom” questions which make it so difficult to gain a firm handle on most of the other NT writings. It is most important as being
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Romans, Letter to The
ROMANS, LETTER TO THE The longest letter of the apostle Paul, written to the Christians of Rome. It is hailed as one of the greatest works of Christian theology and has proved to be one of the most influential works in Christian history. Its master theme is the salvation of the world in Christ (chaps.