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Epistle of Jeremiah
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A letter ascribed to the prophet Jeremiah, probably pseudonymously. Part of the so-called additions to Jeremiah. Most likely written between 300–100 bc. An extended series of polemics directed against idolatry and the Babylonian exiles’ worship of foreign gods. It appears in the Septuagint as an independent book. In the Vulgate it is chapter 6 of the book of Baruch.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Letter of Jeremiah
Letter of Jeremiah A letter ascribed to the prophet Jeremiah, probably pseudonymously. Part of the so-called additions to Jeremiah. Most likely written between 300–100 bc. An extended series of polemics directed against idolatry and the Babylonian exiles’ worship of foreign gods. It appears in the Septuagint
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Jeremiah, Epistle of
JEREMIAH, EPISTLE OF. The Epistle of Jeremiah is neither a letter nor was it written by Jeremiah the prophet. It has more the form of a homily against idolatry and idols. It is extant only in Greek and in several dependent versions. The placement of this epistle differs in various biblical mss. In codex
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Jeremiah, Letter of
Jeremiah, Letter of[Gk Epistolē Ieremiou; AV EPISTLE OF JEREMY]. A letter of the Apocrypha purporting to be written by Jeremiah the prophet to the exiles of Judea who were being deported to Babylon. It warns the captives of the dangers of idolatry and apostasy.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Letter of Jeremiah
LETTER OF JEREMIAH The Letter of Jeremiah is a book accepted as part of the Deuterocanonical works. It was originally written in Hebrew or Aramaic by an unknown Jewish author. The work is no longer extant in the original but has come down to us in the Greek Septuagint. The book cannot be clearly dated;
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Letter of Jeremiah
Letter of Jeremiah, a writing attributed to Jeremiah (late seventh-early sixth centuries bce), but composed most likely in the fourth century bce in order to provide Jews with arguments to counter their Gentile neighbors’ belief in the reality of idols. It is more a homily than a letter, arising from
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Jeremiah, Letter Of
Jeremiah, Letter ofAccording to its superscription, a copy of a letter sent by the prophet Jeremiah to Judean prisoners who were about to be shipped to Babylon. The Letter survives in Greek and other ancient versions such as Syriac and Latin. Translation errors and linguistic usages indicate that it
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Jeremiah, Letter of (Writing)
Jeremiah, Letter of. †A book of the Apocrypha, supposedly a letter written by the prophet Jeremiah in 597 B.C. to those citizens of Judah about to be exiled to Babylon (cf. Jer. 29). Regarded as canonical by Origen and others of the Greek Church Fathers, the letter occurs as an independent book following
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Jeremy, Epistle of
Jeremy, Epistle of, or Letter of Jeremiah. A short item in the OT *Apocrypha. In what purports to be a letter (cf. Jer. 29:1–23), the Prophet *Jeremiah (q.v.) declaims to the exiles whom Nebuchadnezzar transported to Babylon (c. 597 and c. 586 bc) against the folly of idol-worship. The traditional
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Letter of Jeremiah, the
Letter of Jeremiah, TheLetter of Jeremiah, the, a writing attributed to Jeremiah (late seventh-early sixth centuries b.c.) but composed most likely in the fourth century b.c. in order to provide Jews with arguments to counter their gentile neighbors’ belief in the reality of idols. It is more of a
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
JEREMY, THE EPISTLE OF (Writing)
JEREMY, THE EPISTLE OF<jer’-e-mi>, ([ Ἐπιστολὴ Ἰερεμίου, Epistole Ieremiou]):
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 3, H–L
Jeremiah, Epistle of (Writing)
Jeremiah, Epistle of (Ἐπιστολὴ Ἰερεμίου). A short pseudonymous writing, known also as the Letter of Jeremy, included in the Apocrypha as an addendum to Baruch (see Baruch, Book of). In the Septuagint, the book of Lamentations is usually inserted between Baruch and the Epistle of Jeremiah, the three