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Epistle of Apostles
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
Letter of the Apostles. A pseudepigraphal writing that depicts a supposed revelatory dialogue between the risen Christ and his disciples. Often referred to by its Latin name, Epistula Apostolorum. Likely dates to the second-century. It forms the second part of the Ethiopian Book of the Covenant, and is included in the broader version of the New Testament canon of the Ethiopian Orthodox church, but no other Christian group considers it canonical or otherwise authoritative, and it was not widely authoritative in the early church period.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Letter of the Apostles
Letter of the Apostles Letter of the Apostles. A pseudepigraphal writing that depicts a supposed revelatory dialogue between the risen Christ and his disciples. Often referred to by its Latin name, Epistula Apostolorum. Likely dates to the second-century. It forms the second part of the Ethiopian Book
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Apostles, Epistle of
APOSTLES, EPISTLE OF. The Epistle of the Apostles (or Epistula Apostolorum) is an early apocryphal Christian work of unknown authorship. Originally written in Greek, the Ep. Apos. survives only in Ethiopic (complete text), Coptic (approx. two thirds), and Latin (fragments). The title has been inferred
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Apostles, Epistle of The
Apostles, Epistle of theA mid-2nd century c.e. text, probably of Egyptian origin, that represents an attempt by the “orthodox” Church to use the revelation dialogue, a genre typically used by Gnostics, to combat gnosticism. Written as a letter from the disciples to the universal Church, the text includes
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Apostles, Epistle of the (Writing)
Apostles, Epistle of the. A second-century A.D. apocryphal letter purportedly composed by eleven of the apostles (including Cephas [not Peter] and Nathanael) and sent to the churches of the east, west, north, and south. Based largely on the four canonical gospels as well as several apocryphal works,
Dictionary of New Testament Background
Aristeas, Epistle Of
ARISTEAS, EPISTLE OFThe Epistle (a diēgēsis, “Narrative”) of Aristeas purports to be an eyewitness account by a Gentile official at the court of Ptolemy II Philadelphus of the circumstances that led to the translation of the Septuagint. The story of the translation, however, is peripheral, the bulk
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Testament of Our Lord in Galilee
Testament of Our Lord in Galilee, also known as the Epistle of the Apostles (Epistula Apostolorum). This *apocryphal document, dating from c. 150 and written in the form of an encyclical sent out by the eleven Apostles after the Resurrection, purports to record conversations between the Apostles and
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Apostles, Epistle of the (Writing)
Apostles, Epistle of the. An apocryphal letter addressed by the eleven apostles (including Nathanael, and with Cephas distinguished from Peter) to the churches of the four regions of the world. The work is also known as Testament of Our Lord in Galilee. Nowhere mentioned in early Christian literature,
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
APOSTLES, EPISTLE OF THE
APOSTLES, EPISTLE OF THE. The title given to an apocryphal writing preserved in fullest form in Ethiopic (manuscripts from the 14th–20th cent.), partially in Coptic (4th–5th cent.), and fragmentarily in Latin (5th–6th cent.). The first half of the running head of the Latin pages reads “epistle” (epistula),