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Epicureans and Stoics
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Rome
Rome (Ρώμη, Rōmē). Capital city of the Roman Republic and Roman Empire. Located in west-central Italy on the east bank of the Tiber River. The largest and most influential city in the known world by the time of Jesus’ birth.
Rome, the Republic
Rome, Republic of Denotes either the Roman constitutional system or the time period (traditionally 509–49/27 bc) during which Rome expanded from a small city to an empire.
Stoics
Stoics (Στοϊκός, Stoikos). Philosophical movement in the Hellenistic period. Stoicism as a philosophy began in the early fourth century bc. Highly diverse and influential Stoic philosophers developed and transformed the philosophy, enabling it to succeed and retain its vibrancy throughout some of the
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Rome (Place)
ROME (PLACE) [Gk Rhōmaios (Ῥωμαιος), Rhōmē (Ῥωμη)]. ROMANS. The Italian city-state (Lat Roma) which by the 2d century b.c. ruled an empire encompassing the Mediterranean basin and much of its hinterland. References to Rome occur throughout the book of 1 Maccabees and the NT, especially the book
Stoics, Stoicism
STOICS, STOICISM. Stoicism is a modern term referring to the philosophy of the Stoic school. This school took its name from the stoa poikilē, a decoratively painted colonnade in Athens, where Zeno began his philosophic lectures and discussions around 301/300 b.c. (for the name, see Hobein 1931:40–47).
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Epicureans
Epicureans. Those who followed the teachings of the Greek philosopher Epicurus (342–270 bc). Paul encountered some of them while in Athens (Acts 17:18).Epicurus spent his childhood on the island of Samos near the western coast of what is today Turkey. In his late teens he moved to Athens for military
Stoics, Stoicism
Stoics, Stoicism. A widespread Greek and Roman philosophy, well represented in Paul’s audience at Athens (Acts 17:16–34). The apostle was probably familiar with it, for it had begun in Athens around 300 bc, with Zeno’s teaching in the “stoa” (porches) of public buildings, and had spread throughout the
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Epicureans
Epicureans ep-i-kū-rēʹənz [Gk. Epikoureioi] (Acts 17:18). Members of a philosophical movement initiated by Epicurus (341–270 b.c.) on Lesbos off the western coast of Asia Minor (311 b.c.) and taken to Athens (306 b.c.). The movement, which maintained the unaltered teachings of its founder, spread
Rome
Rome The city-state in Italy that became an empire ruling much of the western world at the time of the beginnings of Christianity. I. HistoryA. BeginningsB. RepublicC. Empire II. First-Century RomeA. Socio-Economic Aspects1. The Rich2. The Poor3. Economy4. Slavery5. Jews6. ChristiansB.
Stoics
Stoics stōʹiks [Gk. Stoikos]; AV STOICKS. One of the most important philosophical groups of the Hellenistic period, including the first centuries a.d.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Epicureans
EPICUREANS Those who followed the teachings of the Greek philosopher Epicurus (342–270 bc). Paul encountered some of them while in Athens (Acts 17:18).Epicurus spent his childhood on the island of Samos, near the western coast of what is today Turkey. In his late teens he moved to Athens for military
Stoicism, Stoics
STOICISM*, STOICS A widespread Greek philosophy, well represented in the audience at Athens listening to Paul (Acts 17:16–34). The apostle was probably familiar with it, for it had begun in Athens around 300 bc, with Zeno’s teaching in the “stoa” (porches) of public buildings, and had spread throughout
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Epicureanism
Epicureanism (ep´i-kyoo-ree´uhn-izm), a philosophical school founded by Epicurus (341–270 bce). Epicureans discussed Paul’s religious beliefs with him in Athens, after hearing him preach on the Areopagus (Acts 17:18). Epicurean teaching was expounded in a lengthy poem by the first-century bce Latin writer
Rome
Rome (rohm), the capital and by far the largest city of the Roman Empire.The Early City: Several hills of Rome were settled as early as the tenth and ninth centuries bce. In these pre-Etruscan times, Latins lived on the Palatine and Sabines on the Quirinal hill. The depressions between the hills were
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Epicureans
EPICUREANSThese were philosophers who confronted Paul along with the Stoics (q.v.; Acts 17:18).They followed the teachings of Epicurus (341–270 b.c.), an Athenian citizen though born on the island of Samos near Ephesus. Paul’s familiarity with the philosophy is evident. Menander, writer and friend of
Rome, Roman Empire
ROME, ROMAN EMPIRE. Rome and her empire have meant many things to many people. To Constantine it meant a restoration of greatness and a creation of a new Rome on the Bosporus. To Charlemagne it meant establishment of a Holy Roman Empire in the image of the first Rome. To Innocent III, other popes and
Stoics
STOICS. Philosophers who, with Epicureans, confronted Paul at Athens (Acts 17:18 f.). The poets cited by Paul (Acts 17:28) were the Stoics Aratus (Phaenomena) and Cleanthes (Hymn to Zeus). Begun as a Gr. school of philosophy by Zeno of Citium c. 336–260 b.c., it was embraced by many Romans, including
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Epicureans
EPICUREANS. Some of the philosophers whom Paul encountered at Athens (Acts 17:18) were of this school, whose best-known disciple is the Roman poet Lucretius. The founder, Epicurus, was born in 341 bc on the island of Samos. His early studies under Nausiphanes, a disciple of Democritus, taught him to
Rome
ROME. Founded traditionally in 753 bc on its seven hills (the bluffs formed where the Latin plain falls away into the Tiber bed at the first easy crossing up from the mouth), Rome, as the excavations have shown, was in origin a meeting-place and a melting-pot, rather than the home of a pre-existing people.
Stoics
STOICS. The Stoic school of philosophy derived its name from the Stoa Poikile, the portico in Athens where Zeno of Citium (335–263 bc) first taught its characteristic doctrines. His teaching was systematized and extended by Chrysippus (c. 280–207 bc), the ‘second founder’ of Stoicism. By the time when
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Epicureans
Epicureans (Gk. Epikoúreioi)Epicureanism, a philosophical school deriving from Epicurus (341–271 b.c.e.), who founded a school of thought ca. 306 in Athens, based on his appreciation for nature and for practical philosophy as the medicine of the soul. Epicurus distrusted scholarly philosophy as commonly
Rome
Rome (Lat. Roma; Gk. Rĥmē)A designation both for the ancient city on the Tiber River, located 16 km. (10 mi.) inland from the port of Ostia, as well as for the expansive empire which began to grow during the Republic and continued to increase in size until it reached its greatest extent in the early
Stoics
Stoics (Gk. Stōikoi)Stoicism, a philosophical school founded at Athens by Zeno (ca. 336–263 b.c.e.). Zeno was greatly influenced by Socrates. His teaching was a reaction against Epicurus, who taught that everything that exists is the result of the random or accidental collision of atoms. Zeno, quite
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Epicureans
Epicureans [ĕpˊə kyŏo rēˊənz] (Gk. Epikoureioi).† Members of a philosophical school founded by Epicurus (341–270 B.C.). Epicurus taught that all reality is made up of indestructible and undifferentiated “atoms,” whose integration produces life and whose separation produces death. He acknowledged
Rome
Rome (Gk. Rhōmē; Lat. Roma).† The empire that had its capital at Rome was of inestimable significance in shaping the world of the New Testament, not only because of its political and economic consolidation of the entire Mediterranean region, but also because of the sharing of cultures across
Stoics
Stoics [stōˊĭks] (Gk. Stōikoi). The members of a philosophical school founded by Zeno of Citium (ca. 335–263 B.C.) who taught in the Stoa Poikilē (“Painted Porch”), a colonnaded building in the Agora at Athens, hence the name. In Stoicism the primary focus is on how life is to be lived, with
Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels
Rome
RomeIn NT times Rome was the chief city in Italy and the capital of the Roman Empire. Because of its prestige and importance its name is used both for the city itself and for Roman civilization as a whole. This article deals with Rome in its broadest sense and its impact on the Gospels.*1. Historical
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Rome
ROME One of the greatest empires in the ancient world, and one that shaped significantly the events of Scripture, in particular those of the New Testament. The world into which Jesus Christ was born, lived, and died was entirely dominated by the Roman Empire.
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