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Epicureans
Philosophers following the teaching of Epicurus.
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Epicureans
Epicureans. Those who followed the teachings of the Greek philosopher Epicurus (342–270 bc). Paul encountered some of them while in Athens (Acts 17:18).Epicurus spent his childhood on the island of Samos near the western coast of what is today Turkey. In his late teens he moved to Athens for military
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Epicureans
Epicureans ep-i-kū-rēʹənz [Gk. Epikoureioi] (Acts 17:18). Members of a philosophical movement initiated by Epicurus (341–270 b.c.) on Lesbos off the western coast of Asia Minor (311 b.c.) and taken to Athens (306 b.c.). The movement, which maintained the unaltered teachings of its founder, spread
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Epicureans
EPICUREANS Those who followed the teachings of the Greek philosopher Epicurus (342–270 bc). Paul encountered some of them while in Athens (Acts 17:18).Epicurus spent his childhood on the island of Samos, near the western coast of what is today Turkey. In his late teens he moved to Athens for military
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Epicureanism
Epicureanism (ep´i-kyoo-ree´uhn-izm), a philosophical school founded by Epicurus (341–270 bce). Epicureans discussed Paul’s religious beliefs with him in Athens, after hearing him preach on the Areopagus (Acts 17:18). Epicurean teaching was expounded in a lengthy poem by the first-century bce Latin writer
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Epicureans
EPICUREANSThese were philosophers who confronted Paul along with the Stoics (q.v.; Acts 17:18).They followed the teachings of Epicurus (341–270 b.c.), an Athenian citizen though born on the island of Samos near Ephesus. Paul’s familiarity with the philosophy is evident. Menander, writer and friend of
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Epicureans
EPICUREANS. Some of the philosophers whom Paul encountered at Athens (Acts 17:18) were of this school, whose best-known disciple is the Roman poet Lucretius. The founder, Epicurus, was born in 341 bc on the island of Samos. His early studies under Nausiphanes, a disciple of Democritus, taught him to
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Epicureans
Epicureans (Gk. Epikoúreioi)Epicureanism, a philosophical school deriving from Epicurus (341–271 b.c.e.), who founded a school of thought ca. 306 in Athens, based on his appreciation for nature and for practical philosophy as the medicine of the soul. Epicurus distrusted scholarly philosophy as commonly
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Epicureans
Epicureans [ĕpˊə kyŏo rēˊənz] (Gk. Epikoureioi).† Members of a philosophical school founded by Epicurus (341–270 B.C.). Epicurus taught that all reality is made up of indestructible and undifferentiated “atoms,” whose integration produces life and whose separation produces death. He acknowledged
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Epicureans the
Epicure´ans, The, derived their name from Epicurus (342–271 b.c.), a philosopher of Attic descent, whose “Garden” at Athens rivalled in popularity the “Porch” and the “Academy.” The doctrines of Epicurus found wide acceptance in Asia Minor and Alexandria. (95–50 b.c.) The object of Epicurus was to find
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Epicureans, the
EPICURE´ANS, THE (ep-i-ku-rēʹanz). The name derives from Epicurus (342–271 b.c.), a philosopher of Attic descent whose “Garden” at Athens rivaled the “Porch” and the “Academy” in popularity. The doctrines of Epicurus found wide acceptance in Asia Minor and Alexandria, and they gained a brilliant advocate
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Epicureans
Epicureansfollowers of Epicurus (who died at Athens B.C. 270), or adherents of the Epicurean philosophy (Acts 17:18). This philosophy was a system of atheism, and taught men to seek as their highest aim a pleasant and smooth life. They have been called the “Sadducees” of Greek paganism. They, with the
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Epicureans
EpicureansEpicureans (ep-i-kyuhr-reeʹuhns), followers of the philosopher Epicurus (342-270 b.c.). Members of the Epicurean school of philosophy established in Athens are mentioned in Acts 17:18. Epicurean teaching was expounded in a lengthy poem by the first-century b.c. Latin writer Lucretius. Epicureans