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Ephphatha
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Ephphatha
Ephphatha (ἐφφαθα, ephphatha). An Aramaic imperative that means “Be opened”. Used by Christ when healing a blind man (Mark 7:34).
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Ephphatha
EPHPHATHA [Gk ephphatha (ἐφφαθα)]. Found in Mark 7:34 in words attributed to Jesus and addressed to a blind man whom he was healing, the word is there given a Gk translation, dianoichthēti, “be opened.” Since Wellhausen it has been widely regarded as reflecting the 2d person masc. sing. Ithpeʿel (reflexive-passive)
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Ephphatha
Ephphatha. Transliteration in the imperative voice of the Aramaic expression “be opened,” used by Jesus in the healing of a deaf mute (Mk 7:34). No attempt at establishing a magical word formula was intended; the author apparently desired simply to preserve the actual wording. A connection with Isaiah
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Ephphatha
Ephphatha efʹə-thə ef-äʹthə [Gk. ephphathá (transliteration of Aram; cf. Heb. pāṯaḥ)]. An Aramaic word used by Christ in the healing of the deaf-mute (Mk. 7:34; cf. Isa. 35:5). Mark translates the term with Gk. dianoị́chtheti, “be opened.” This, with the corresponding act of the touch with the
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Ephphatha
EPHPHATHA* Transliteration in the imperative voice of the Aramaic expression “be opened,” used by Jesus in the healing of a deaf mute (Mk 7:34, nlt mg). No attempt at establishing a magical word formula was intended; Mark simply preserved Jesus’ actual wording.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Ephphatha
ephphatha (ef´uh-thuh), the contraction of an Aramaic verb meaning “Let it be opened.” In Mark 7:34 Jesus gives this command while curing a man who is deaf and unable to speak.
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Ephphatha
EPHPHATHA. A transliteration of the Aramaic used by Jesus to the deaf-mute in Decapolis (Mk 7:34). It is the imperative form, “Be opened”; and at the sovereign word of Jesus the mouth and ears of the man were freed from their affliction.
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Ephphatha
EPHPHATHA. The actual word addressed by Jesus to the deaf man (Mk. 7:34). It is probably an Aramaic imperative transliterated into Greek, and the Evangelist adds the translation (in Greek), ‘be opened’. The Aramaic Verb used is peṯaḥ, ‘to open’; it is not certain whether the simple passive (ethpeel)
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Ephphatha
Ephphatha (Gk. Ephphatha)Greek transliteration of an Aramaic term in Jesus’ command that a man’s ears and mouth “be opened” so that the man can hear and speak (Mark 7:34). It represents the passive imperative verb pĕtaḥ, “to open.” Hellenistic miracles often contained unusual words which conveyed
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Ephphatha
Ephphatha [ĕfˊə thə] (Gk. ephphathá). An Aramaic expression (transliterated from Aram. ˒eṯpetaḥ), meaning “be opened,” used by Jesus in the curing of the deaf-mute (Mark 7:34). As a result, the individual could hear and speak (v. 35). Mark may have intended to preserve Jesus’ authentic words.
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Ephphatha
EPHPHATHA A Greek transliteration of the Aramaic word meaning “open.” Christ used the word (Mark 7:34) in his cure of a man who was deaf and had a speech impediment.
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Ephphatha
Ephphatha. The ceremony in the Roman Baptismal rite in which the celebrant in pronouncing the words ‘Ephphatha, that is Be opened’ (Mk. 7:34) touches the ears and mouth of the candidate, praying that he may hear and preach the faith. It is found from an early date in the Baptismal service for Easter
Key passages
Mk 7:34

And looking up to heaven, he sighed and said to him, “Ephphatha!” (that is, “Be opened!”).