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Enemessar
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
An Assyrian king mentioned in the book of Tobit (Tobit 1:2, 15, 16). Ενεμεσσαρος (Enemessaros) is often translated as “Shalmaneser” and taken as a reference to the Assyrian king Shalmaneser V. This is based partially on the Latin Vulgate‘s rendering Salmanasar.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Enemessar
Enemessar (Ενεμεσσαρος, Enemessaros). An Assyrian king mentioned in the book of Tobit (Tobit 1:2, 15, 16). Ενεμεσσαρος (Enemessaros) is often translated as “Shalmaneser” and taken as a reference to the Assyrian king Shalmaneser V. This is based partially on the Latin Vulgate‘s rendering Salmanasar.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Enemessar (Person)
ENEMESSAR (PERSON) [Gk Eneméssar (os) (Ἐνεμέσσαρος)]. The name of an Assyrian king in the book of Tobit during whose reign Tobit was taken into captivity (1:2). His successor is said to have been his son Sennachereim (Sennacherib; Tob 1:15), who in turn was followed on the throne by Sacherdonos (Esarhaddon;
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Enemessar
Enemessar en-a-mes̀ar, [Gk. Enemessar, Enemessaros] (AV, RSV mg, NEB mg, Tob. 1:2, 15, etc.). The name of an Assyrian king, generally considered (since H. Grotius, 17th cent.) to be a corruption (though sometimes defended as an alternative form) of the name of Shalmaneser who carried Israel captive
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
ENEMESSAR
ENEMESSAR<en-e-mes’-ar> ([ Ἐνεμεσσάρ, Enemessar], [ Ἐνεμέσσαρος, Enemessaros]): Generally allowed, since Grotius, to be a corruption, though occasionally defended as an alternative form, of Shalmaneser (Tobit 1:2, 15, etc.) who carried Israel captive to Nineveh, as related in 2 Ki. Among the
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 2, D–G
Enemessar
Enemessar en’uh-mes’uhr (Ενεμεσσαρος). An Assyrian king during whose reign Tobit was taken captive (Tob. 1:2, 16, KJV; NRSV, “Shalmaneser”); when he died, he was supposedly succeeded by Sennacherib (1:15). Because Sennacherib’s father was Sargon II (really an adopted title, Akk. šarru-kēn, “the king
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Enemessar
ENEMESSAR, en-ē̇-mesʹar (Ἐνεμεσσάρ, Enemessár, Ἐνεμέσσαρος, Eneméssaros): Generally allowed, since Grotius, to be a corruption, though occasionally defended as an alternative form, of Shalmaneser (Tob 1:2, 15, etc) who carried Israel captive to Nineveh, as related in 2 K. Among the captives was