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En-Boqeq
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
An oasis and its two springs, about 8 miles south of Masada near the Dead Sea; known for the production of Judean balsam. Both Josephus (Jewish War 4.468–70) and Strabo (Geography 16.2.40) describe the Dead Sea region’s agriculture, though neither writer specifically mentions En-Boqeq. Known as Qasr Umm Baghgheq in Arabic, the site was first identified as En-Boqeq by F. de Saulcy in 1853 and excavated in 1967–1972 by Mordecai Gichon for Tel Aviv University.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
En-Boqeq
En-Boqeq An oasis and its two springs, about 8 miles south of Masada near the Dead Sea; known for the production of Judean balsam. Both Josephus (Jewish War 4.468–70) and Strabo (Geography 16.2.40) describe the Dead Sea region’s agriculture, though neither writer specifically mentions En-Boqeq. Known
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
En-Boqeq
EN-BOQEQ (M.R. 185067). An oasis on the SW shores of the Dead Sea. Like En Gedi 33 km to the N, it thrived on the growth of precious plants indigenous to hot climates. These were watered by two springs: En Boqeq and En Noith, producing 216,000 m3 and 17,500 m3 per annum respectively. The original name
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
En-
EN-. This prefix in Heb. stands for ‘ayin which primarily means “eye”; secondarily it means “fountain.” Figuratively, it was anything which resembled the eye, a look or glance of the eye, an aspect or appearance of a thing. Thus, the usage for “spring” or “fountain” was derived. Many cities and places
The Archaeological Encyclopedia of the Holy Land
En Boqeq
EN BOQEQ A small oasis on the southwestern shore of the Dead Sea formed by two springs gushing out of the eastern slopes of the escarpment and falling to the Dead Sea. The site was known by its Arab name Qasr Umm Baghgheq. It was first discovered by the French scholar F. de Saulcy in 1853, and was examined