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Emar
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A city in Syria on the west bank of the great bend of the Euphrates River (modern Meskene). Documents at Ebla and Mari show that Emar existed as early as the third millennium and was destroyed in the twelfth century bc (when the Sea Peoples invaded). Emar is not mentioned in the Bible. However, texts found at the site—dating to the 13th and 12th centuries bc—offer insight into the ritual activities of a late Bronze Age city. The ritual activities contained in books like Genesis and Leviticus are better understood when compared with other rituals of the same time period—like those found at Emar.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Emar
Emar A city in Syria on the west bank of the great bend of the Euphrates River (modern Meskene). Documents at Ebla and Mari show that Emar existed as early as the third millennium and was destroyed in the twelfth century bc (when the Sea Peoples invaded). Emar is not mentioned in the Bible. However,
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Emar
EMAR (36°01´N; 38°05´E). A Bronze Age city, modern Tell Meskene/Balis, located on the great bend of the Euphrates river in Syria. The name of the city does not appear in the Bible; nevertheless, the archaeological and epigraphic material that has been found there portrays in a remarkable way the period
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 2, D–G
Emar
Emar ee’mahr. Also Imar. An ancient city in N Syria, not mentioned in the Bible. The site is known today as Tell Meskene, about 60 mi. E of Aleppo, on the middle Euphrates River. Although the existence of Emar is attested as early as the 3rd millennium, the city was abandoned at some point (prob. because
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
EMAR
EMAR. Excavations conducted at Tell Meskéné (Emar) in northern Syria along the Euphrates unearthed over 1,000 tablets, predominately written in Akkadian. Emar, established in the 14th cent. by the HITTITES, was destroyed during the tumultuous days that characterized the end of the Late Bronze Age (ca.