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Elohist
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
Abbreviated as E Source or simply “E.” One of four sources outlined in the Documentary Hypothesis. Traditionally dated to the Solomonic period (ca. 900 bc). Attributed to a writer known as the Elohist who prefers to use a generic name for God, “Elohim” (אְֶלֹהִים‎, elohim), as opposed to Yahweh (preferred by the J source).
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Source, Elohist
Elohist Source Abbreviated as E Source or simply “E.” One of four sources outlined in the Documentary Hypothesis. Traditionally dated to the Solomonic period (ca. 900 bc). Attributed to a writer known as the Elohist who prefers to use a generic name for God, “Elohim” (אְֶלֹהִים‎, elohim), as opposed to
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Elohist
ELOHIST. Anonymous author or authors of one of the four sources or collections of traditions which were combined, according to the documentary hypothesis, to form the Pentateuch. The symbol “E” was chosen because of the source’s preference for the Hebrew word Elohim (“God”) in referring to the Deity.
E
E. The abbreviation used by scholars to designate the Elohist source in Pentateuchal source criticism. See ELOHIST.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Elohist
Elohist (el´oh-hist), the name given by modern biblical scholars to the author(s) of material that served as one of the sources for what is now found in the books of Genesis–Numbers. The abbreviation used as a siglum for this source or body of tradition is “E.” The designation Elohist (or E) derives
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Elohist
ElohistOne of four sources or strata underlying and composing the Pentateuch. The discernment of such sources is far from assured, nor do those who see sources always agree on their features. Nevertheless, a coherent portrait of the Elohist may be attempted.The Elohist (E) is typically understood as
E
EDesignation of the Elohist source, regarded as one of the principal strata of the Pentateuch.
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Elohist
Elohist [ĕlˊō hĭst].† One of the four principal sources or “strands” of the Pentateuch as identified by source critics, and the designation of the authorcompiler, school, or tradition which produced it; both are represented by the symbol E. The name derives from the characteristic use in this material
E
E. Designation of the Elohist source, considered by source critics to be one of the principal strata of the Pentateuch. See also Biblical Criticism.
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
‘E’
‘E’. A symbol widely used by scholars who follow the ‘documentary hypothesis’ of the origins of the *Pentateuch; it denotes the Elohistic (Heb. אֱלֹהִים‎, ˒elohim, ‘God’) source. This consists largely of narrative, and together with ‘*J’ (q.v.) comprises most of the famous stories of the Patriarchs
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Elohist
ElohistElohist (elʹoh-ist), the name given one of the sources found in the books of Genesis through Numbers. The siglum given the source is ‘E,’ which is derived from its use of the name Elohim for God prior to the revealing of the name Yahweh to Moses (Exod. 3:13–15). While it is more difficult, compared
E
EE, in modern biblical source criticism the letter that refers to materials presumed to derive from a northern Israelite milieu. The letter E itself is an abbreviation of the divine name Elohim, the use of which is taken to be one of the characteristics of this source in the patriarchal narratives.
Dictionary of Phrase and Fable
Elohistic
Elohis′tic and Jehovis′tic Scriptures. The Pentateuch is supposed by Bishop Colenso and many others to have been written at two widely different periods, because God is invariably called Elo′him in some paragraphs, while in others He is no less invariably called Jehovah. The Elohistic paragraphs, being
Dictionary of Theological Terms
Elohist
ElohistAn imaginary character claimed by rationalistic Higher Critics (see Criticism) to be one of a number of unknown authors whose documents were welded together with others by a later editor and presented to the world as the work of Moses. The Elohist is supposed to be distinguished by his use of
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 2, D–G
Elohist
Elohist el’oh-hist. A designation (abbreviated “E”) for the author or editor of one of the sources supposedly used in the redaction of the Pentateuch. This source is thought to have stemmed from the northern kingdom in the 8th cent. B.C.; it is characterized by the use of the common Hebrew term for God,
E
E. An abbreviation for Elohist; it is used (along with D, J, and P) to designate one of the supposed sources of the Pentateuch, according to the Documentary Hypothesis.
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
E, ELOHIST
E, ELOHIST el´oh-hist. One of four principal written sources of the Pentateuch posited by the Documentary Hypothesis. This source derives its name from its so-called preference for the divine designation Elohim, “God.” Scholars have long debated whether E materials represent a continuous literary strand