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Elohim
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Elohim
Elohim (אֱלֹהִים‎, elohim). A masculine plural form of El (אֵל‎, el). Lexically, this word has several meanings; in Scripture, it typically means “God” or “gods” and also refers to Yahweh (יהוה‎, yhwh), the God of Israel.
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Elohim
Elohim. General name for God in the OT. The etymology of Elohim is uncertain, but it is generally agreed that it is based on a root that means “might” or “power.” The word is plural in form, but when applied to the true God it is used in a singular sense and most frequently with verbal elements. The
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Elohim
ELOHIM* General name for God in the OT. The etymology of Elohim is uncertain, but it is generally agreed that it is based on a root that means “might” or “power.” The word is plural in form, but when applied to the true God, it is used in a singular sense and most frequently with verbal elements. The
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Elohim
ELOHIM. A plural form of the Heb. noun ’lôah describing Deity. Some erroneously regard it as the plural of El (q.v.), but it is not from the same root. It is usually translated “God,” although sometimes it is a true plural and must be understood as “gods” (Ex 12:12; Gen 35:2, 4; Deut 29:18; 32:17).
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Elohim
Elohim (Heb. ʾĕlōhɩ̂m)The most frequent generic name for God in the OT; possibly a plural of Eloah, itself an expansion of El, “god.”Elohim most naturally refers to a plurality of gods, e.g., those of Egypt (Exod. 12:12), Syria, Sidon, Moab, the Ammonites and the Philistines (Judg. 10:6), and the
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Elohim
Elohim [ĕl ō hĭmˊ] (Heb. ˒elōhîm).†; A Hebrew term referring to gods in general, and the most frequent Old Testament name for God; it occurs most often in those passages of the Pentateuch which source critics assign to the Elohistic and Priestly sources and in certain “Elohistic Psalms.” The
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Elohim
ELOHIM (Hebrew ʾělōhîm) One of the names of God, a plural form of “El.” (See God.)
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Elohim
Elohim (Heb. אֱלֹהִים, lit. ‘gods’). Used occasionally in the OT of heathen gods, supernatural beings, or earthly judges, but generally of the God of Israel, for whom it is a very frequent term, esp. in what has often been reckoned the second oldest *Pentateuchal source (the supposed writer of which
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Elohim
ELO´HIM (e-lōʹhîm; Heb. plural ˒ĕlōhı̂m; singular ˒ĕlôah, “mighty”). A term sometimes used in the ordinary sense of gods, whether true or false (Ex. 12:12, 32:4; etc.), including Jehovah (Ps. 76:7; Ex. 18:11; etc.). W. Henry Green (Hom. Mag. [Sept. 1898]: 257ff.) thus summarizes the principles
Dictionary of Phrase and Fable
Elohim
Elohim. The genus of which ghosts, Chemosh, Dagon, Baal, Jahveh, etc., were species. The ghost or spectre which appeared to Saul (1 Sam. 28:14–20) is called Elohim. “I see Elohim coming up out of the earth,” said the witch; and Saul asked, “What is HE like?” (Huxley: Nineteenth Century, March, 1886.)
Ecclesiastical Dictionary: Containing, in Concise Form, Information upon Ecclesiastical, Biblical, Archæological, and Historical Subjects
Elohim
Elohim (plural of the preceding word).—One of the names of God of frequent occurrence in the Hebrew text of the Old Testament. Biblical critics are not agreed as to the reason for the use of the plural form: some regard it as a covert suggestion of the Trinity; others as a plural of excellence; others
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 2, D–G
Eloah, Elohim
Eloah, Elohim i-loh’uh, el’oh-him (אֱלו̇הַּH468, אֱלֹהִיםH466, prob. related to אֵלH446 [see El]). Two Hebrew names for God. The term Eloah occurs almost sixty times, mostly in poetic sections of the OT (e.g., Deut. 32:15, 17; Job 3:4 [and very frequently in this book]; Ps. 18:31; Dan. 11:37–39; et
Key passages
Ex 21:6

his master will present him to God and bring him to the door or to the doorpost, and his master will pierce his ear with an awl, and he will serve him forever.

Ps 82:1

God stands in the divine assembly; he administers judgment in the midst of the gods.

See also
Related
God