Loading…
Eloah
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A Hebrew name for God. A variant form of the common Northwest Semitic word for god, אֵל‎ (el) (Deut 32:15; Job 3:4; Psa 18:32; Prov 30:5; Hab 3:3). The name Eloah appears most often in biblical poetry, especially in the poetry of Job, where it is used 46 times (e.g., Job 3:4; 4:9; 5:17; 6:4). For further information, see these articles: Elohim; Names of God in the Old Testament.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Eloah
Eloah (אֱלוֹהַ‎, eloah). A Hebrew name for God. A variant form of the common Northwest Semitic word for god, אֵל‎ (el) (Deut 32:15; Job 3:4; Psa 18:32; Prov 30:5; Hab 3:3). The name Eloah appears most often in biblical poetry, especially in the poetry of Job, where it is used 46 times (e.g., Job 3:4; 4:9;
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Eloah
Eloah. Hebrew name for God which stresses that he alone is deserving of worship.See God, Names of.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Eloah
ELOAH* Hebrew name for God stressing that he alone is deserving of worship. See God, Names of.
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Eloah
Eloah (Heb. ʾĕlôah)A Hebrew name for God, occurring most frequently in biblical texts where non-Israelites would not be familiar with the names of God associated with the tradition history of Israel. Many scholars believe that Eloah could be a later singular form of Elohim. While the word often refers
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Eloah
Eloah [ĕ lōˊə] (Heb. ˒elôah).* A Hebrew name for God, thought by some to be a later singular derivative of Elohim (Heb. ˒elōhîm; cf. Aram. ˒elāh). The term is used both as a generic designation for a deity (e.g., Job 12:6; cf. Heb. ˒ēl, ˒elōhîm) and as a name of the Israelite God
Dictionary of Deities and Demons in the Bible
Eloah
ELOAH אלהI. The Hebrew word ʾĕlōah is derived from a base ʾilāh-, perhaps a secondary form of the Common Semitic word ʾil-, ‘god’. Cognate terms are known from Ugaritic, Aramaic, and Arabic/Arabian. The relationship between the common noun and the divine name is complicated and it varies considerably
Ecclesiastical Dictionary: Containing, in Concise Form, Information upon Ecclesiastical, Biblical, Archæological, and Historical Subjects
Eloham
Eloham.—Hebrew word which signifies any God, but mostly employed for the true God. The contents of the discourse makes its real meaning known in the different passages where it is used in the Bible.
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 2, D–G
Eloah, Elohim
Eloah, Elohim i-loh’uh, el’oh-him (אֱלו̇הַּH468, אֱלֹהִיםH466, prob. related to אֵלH446 [see El]). Two Hebrew names for God. The term Eloah occurs almost sixty times, mostly in poetic sections of the OT (e.g., Deut. 32:15, 17; Job 3:4 [and very frequently in this book]; Ps. 18:31; Dan. 11:37–39; et
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
ELOAH
ELOAH i-loh´uh [אֱלוֹהַּʾeloah]. Translated “God,” it is a cognate to Arabic “Allah” and occurs fifty-seven times in the Bible, mostly in late texts (forty-one in Job). The Aram. form ʾellah (אֱלָּה) is attested ninety-six times in Aram. portions of the Bible, thus perhaps the Hebrew was derived from
1. ʾelohim, ʾeloah, ʾel
1. ʾelohim, ʾeloah, ʾelThe generic names for God in the OT are ʾelohim, ʾeloah, and ʾel. ʾElohim occurs over 2,570 times in the OT. The name is not attested outside of the OT. ʾElohim is generally used interchangeably with ʾel and Yahweh. The discrete use of ʾelohim in some Psalms (compare Ps 14 with
2. Eloah
2. EloahRelated to the plural form ʾelohim is the singular ʾeloah. The Hebrew term appears far less frequently than the plural form, occurring only 57 times in the Bible; its Aramaic equivalent, ʾelah is attested 96 times in the Aramaic portions of the Bible. As a divine name, Eloah occurs most frequently
See also
Related
God