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Edom
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Edom
Edom (אֱדוֹם‎, edom; “red”). A geographical region south of the Dead Sea; a kingdom depicted as a constant enemy of Israel.
Idumea
Idumea (Ἰδουμαια, Idoumaia). Also known as Idumaea. The Greek name for a territory located south of Judaea during the Second Temple period, in the same general area as the ancient land of Edom. Homeland of Herod the Great. Referenced once in the New Testament (Mark 3:8). Played an important role in the
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Edom (Place)
EDOM (PLACE) [Heb ʾedôm (אֶדֹום)]. EDOMITE. A territory that in OT times was generally located S and E of the Dead Sea. The word “Edom” is derived from a Semitic root meaning “red,” “ruddy.” The name was thus probably given to the area because of the reddish color of the sandstone there. This entry
Idumea (Place)
IDUMEA (PLACE) [Gk Idoumaia (Ἰδουμαια)]. IDUMEANS. A territory that during the Second Temple period stretched approximately from the S portion of the Judean hill country to the N part of the Negeb. To the N, the borders ran between Beth-Zur and Alouros (Ḥalḥūl), while the S border reached the height
Seir (Place)
SEIR (PLACE) [Heb śēʿı̂r (שֵׂעִיר‎)]. 1. The biblical name for part of the country of Edom (Gen 14:6; 36:20–21, 30; Deut 1:2, 44; 2:1; 33:2; Josh 11:17; 12:7; Judg 5:4; Isa 21:11; 1 Chr 1:38; 4:42) and, secondarily, a synonym for Edom, both in the geographical and the political sense (Gen 32:4; 33:14,
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Edom, Edomites
Edom, Edomites. Land and its inhabitants found on the high plateau to the south and southeast of the Dead Sea. The biblical term Edom, meaning “red,” denotes either the name of the land or the name of Esau, in remembrance of the red pottage for which he exchanged his birthright (Gn 25:30; 36:1, 8, 19).
Idumaea, Idumeans
Idumaea, Idumeans. Term derived from the Greek form of Edom (“red”). The change from Edomite to Idumean resulted from the conquests of Alexander the Great, which made Greek the common language of the area. The name was applied to the former country of the Edomites and to the portion of south Judah occupied
Seir (Place)
Seir (Place). 1. Mountain range of Edom extending from the Dead Sea southward to the Gulf of Aqaba. Mt Seir was bordered by the great valley of Arabah on the west and desert on the east. Seir is the modern Jebel esh-Shera‛Seir was formerly inhabited by the Horites, whose defeat to King Chedorlaomer
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Edom
Edom ēʹdəm; EDOMITES ēʹdəm-īts [Heb. ʾĕḏôm, ʾaḏōmîm; Gk. Edōm; Ugar. ʾudm; Akk. Udumu; Egyp ʾdm, Aduma].The country S of Moab and E and W of the Arabah, and its people. The name Edom is derived from the Semitic root meaning “red,” “ruddy”; it may have been given to the land because of the
Idumea
Idumea id-ū-mēʹə [Gk. Idoumaia, Idoumea—‘(land) of the Edomites’]. The Greek name for Edom as found in the LXX and sometimes used interchangeably with Edom in the AV. The name was eventually attached to the region S of Judea occupied by Edomites (Idumeans) who moved there after the fall of Jerusalem
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Edom, Edomites
EDOM, EDOMITES Land and its inhabitants found on the high plateau to the south and southeast of the Dead Sea. The biblical term Edom, meaning “red,” denotes either the name of the land or the name of Esau, in remembrance of the red pottage or stew for which he exchanged his birthright (Gn 25:30; 36:1,
Idumaea, Idumea, Idumeans
IDUMAEA*, IDUMEA, IDUMEANS Term derived from the Greek form of Edom (“red”). The change from Edomite to Idumean resulted from the conquests of Alexander the Great, which made Greek the common language of the area. The name was applied to the former country of the Edomites and to the portion of south
Seir (Place)
SEIR (Place)1. Mountain range of Edom extending from the Dead Sea southward to the Gulf of Aqaba. Mt Seir was bordered by the great valley of Arabah on the west and by desert on the east. Seir is the modern Jebel esh-Shera.Seir was formerly inhabited by the Horites, whose defeat to King Kedorlaomer
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Edom
Edom (ee´duhm; Semitic, “red,” ruddy”).1 An alternative name for Esau (Gen. 36:1, 8) He was the brother of Jacob/Israel, and the elder of the twin sons of Isaac and Rebekah (25:19–26). The land of Edom (see 2) is identified as the region where his descendants lived. Thus, Esau/Edom is the ancestor of
Idumea
Idumea (id´yoo-mee´uh), the Greek name for Edom as found in the lxx. After the exile (587/6 bce) the name designated the region in Judea from Beth-zur to south of Beer-sheba, an area occupied in part by Edomites (Idumeans, Ezek. 36:5). Throughout the Seleucid, Hasmonean, and Herodian periods (ca. 198
Oholibamah
Oholibamah (oh-hoh´li-bah´muh; Heb., “tent of the high place”).1 The daughter of Anah and wife of Esau (Gen. 36:2, 5). She bore three children: Jeush, Jalam, and Korah (Gen. 36:5, 14, 18).2 A descendant of Esau and a chieftain of the Edomites (Gen. 36:41; 1 Chron. 1:52).
Seir
Seir (see´uhr; Heb., “hairy”).1 The mountainous region southeast of the land of Canaan inhabited by the Edomites. Also called “Mount Seir,” the region may have encompassed, not only the mountains east of the Arabah (the Rift Valley), but also those on the west side. This is suggested by such passages
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Edom
EDOM. The term Edom means red. It has three possible origins: the red sandstone cliffs of the country (there is evidence that the country may have been called ˒ĕdôm, or “red,” before Esau subjugated the Horites); Esau’s red hair at birth; or the red pottage which Esau took in exchange for his inheritance
Idumaea
IDUMAEA. This term was used by the Greeks and Romans (with slightly different spellings) to refer to the region inhabited by the descendants of Esau—the Edomites of the OT. See Esau. The word appears once in the Bible, Mk 3:8 (the KJV uses it in Isa 34:5–6; Ezk 35:15; 36:5), but Edom is given by other
Seir
SEIR1. A mountainous land inhabited by the Edomites. The etymology (Heb. se`ir) suggests something hairy or shaggy and may be descriptive of the former wooded nature of the landscape. However, the name may be eponymous since Seir is mentioned once in Amarna letter #288 written from Jerusalem (ANET,
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Idumaea
IDUMAEA. The Gk. form (idoumaia) of the Heb. ’eḏôm refers to an area in W Palestine, rather than to Edom proper. At the time of the Exodus, Edom extended to both sides of the Arabah, and the W portion reached close to Kadesh (Nu. 20:16). David subdued Edom, but there was continual conflict between
Seir
SEIR. 1. The word śē‘ir defines a mountain (Gn. 14:6; Ezk. 35:15), a land (Gn. 32:3; 36:21; Nu. 24:18) and a people (Ezk. 25:8) in the general area of old Edom. Esau went to live there (Gn. 32:3), and his descendants overcame the original inhabitants, the Horites (Gn. 14:6; 36:20; Dt. 2:12; Jos. 24:4).
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Edom
Edom (Heb. ʾĕḏôm)The name of a nation, a geographical region, and a person in OT times. Edom is derived from a root meaning “red.” The association of name with the place is usually explained by the reddish appearance of the rock and soil formations; with the person it is sometimes assumed that Edom
Idumea
Idumea (Gk. Idoumaɩ́a, Idouméa)Designation used in the Hellenistic age for the territory stretching north to south from the southern portion of the Judean hill country to the northern part of the Negeb, and east to west from the Judean desert to the Philistine cities of Gaza and Ashdod. Its major cities
Oholibamah
Oholibamah (Heb. ʾohŏlɩ̂ḇāmâ)1. A wife of Esau, and the daughter of Anah the son of Zibeon the Hivite (Gen. 36:2, 25). She bore three sons (Gen. 36:5, 14, 18). Oholibamah is not named among Esau’s wives at Gen. 26:34; 28:9.2. The chief of an Edomite clan (Gen. 36:41; 1 Chr. 1:52).
Seir (Place)
Seir (Heb. kēʿɩ̂r) (PLACE)1. A high hilly plateau within the region of Edom. Seir is identified with modern Jebel esh-Sharah, a mountain range between Wadi el-Ḥesā in the north and Râs en-Naqb in the south, and running between the Arabah on the west and the desert on the east. The edges of the mountain
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Edom
Edom [ēˊdəm] (Heb. ˒eḏôm; Akk. Udumu; Egyp. Aduma).† A country neighboring on Israel, located south of Moab and east of the Arabah; its inhabitants were the Edomites (Heb. ˒aḏōmîm). The name is derived from the common Semitic root ˒dm “red, ruddy,” an apt description of the red sandstone
Idumea
Idumea [ĭdˊŏo mēˊyə] (Gk. Idoumaia, Idoumea “[land] of the Edomites”).† The Hellenistic Greek name for the territory south of Judea then inhabited by the Edomites, who had been displaced from their territory by the Nabateans; in the LXX and Josephus the term designates Edom proper. Located west
The Archaeological Encyclopedia of the Holy Land
Edom; Edomites
EDOM; EDOMITES The name of a country and a people to the east of the Arabah, bordered by Ammon on the north, the Dead Sea and the Arabah on the west and the desert on the south and east. In the early 4th millennium bc the land was inhabited by semi-nomadic peoples who practised primitive forms of agriculture.
Idumea
IDUMEA The region south of Judea, which in the Persian period was settled by Edomites. It included the southern hills of Judah, its southern border being north of Beer-Sheba. In the early Hellenistic period Marissa (Mareshah) became its capital. During the reign of the Seleucids Idumea was enlarged to
Seir
SEIR a) The name of a mountainous region southeast of the Dead Sea. The name occurs for the first time in a topographical list of Amenophis III. In the El Amarna letters the prince of Jerusalem informs the king of Egypt that war against the king is raging in the mountains of Seir. In the 13th century
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Edom
EDOM, EDOMITES (Hebrew, “red” or “ruddy”) A territory stretching south and east of the Dead Sea to the Gulf of Aqaba; the Edomites are its inhabitants. They are described as the descendants of Esau, the elder brother of Jacob (Gen 25:30, 32:4, 36:1; 1 Chr 1:35). Archaeologists trace the origins of the