Loading…
Edessa
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A major theological and cultural center of the early church (known as the “Athens of the East”) that produced theologians, historians, and significant thinkers who shaped the early centuries of Christianity.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Edessa
Edessa A major theological and cultural center of the early church (known as the “Athens of the East”) that produced theologians, historians, and significant thinkers who shaped the early centuries of Christianity.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Edessa
EDESSA (37°08´N; 38°46´E). Modern Urfa in E Turkey, also known as Syr ʾUrḥāy (Orhay), Ar al-Ruḥa.A. Topography and Political HistoryB. Pre-Christian Culture and ReligionC. Earliest Christianity in EdessaD. Syriac Language and LiteratureA. Topography and Political HistoryProtected on three sides
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Edessa
Edessa. The site has probably been inhabited from remote times, but the present city (now Urfa) was founded by Seleucus 1 in 304 bc. After the fall of Seleucid power it was the centre of an independent kingdom from c. 132 bc until AD 214, and then a Roman colony. It was from a very early date the
Ecclesiastical Dictionary: Containing, in Concise Form, Information upon Ecclesiastical, Biblical, Archæological, and Historical Subjects
Edessa
Edessa.—A very ancient city of Mesopotamia. Christianity was early introduced into it, and the city contained a large number of monasteries. It was the seat of Ephraem Syrus and his school. Here the famous portrait of Christ is said to have been painted by St. Luke and sent by the Saviour Himself, with
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 2, D–G
Edessa
Edessa i-des’uh. An ancient city in NW Mesopotamia, between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers; today it is Şcanli Urfa, in SE Turkey, near the border with Syria (not to be confused with Edhessa in N Greece). Also known as Orhay (Syr. ʾUrḥay) and Antioch Callirrhoe, it became prominent as the capital
A Dictionary of Early Christian Beliefs: A Reference Guide to More than 700 Topics Discussed by the Early Church Fathers
Edessa
EDESSAEdessa, a small kingdom lying at the eastern edge of the Roman Empire, became a center for eastern, Aramaic Christianity. It was eventually absorbed into the Roman Empire and later into the Persian empire.After Jesus was risen from the abode of the dead and was received into heaven, Thomas the
The Eerdmans Encyclopedia of Early Christian Art and Archaeology, Volumes 1–3
Edessa (Greece)
Edessa (Greece)Macedonian city located on the edge of Mt. Vermion above the Macedonian plain in northern Greece (see map 9, G3). E. controlled a pass into western Macedonia and was a major station on the Via Egnatia (which crossed northern Greece from → Durrës to → Thessaloniki and → Constantinople).
Urfa
UrfaAncient Edessa in southeastern Turkey; the city is surrounded by mountains on three sides, and the Haran plain stretches to the southeast (see map 10, K7). The Daisan (Skirtus) flows through Edessa and repeatedly has caused devastating floods. Several springs exist in the city, one of which waters
Encyclopedia of Ancient Christianity
Edessa
EDESSA (Syriac Urhây, Arabic ar-Ruhâ, now Urfa in Turkey)I. HistoryII. Archaeology.
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
EDESSA
EDESSA [Ἐδέσσα Edessa]. A prominent ancient Mesopotamian city, with a location corresponding to modern Urfa or Orhay in eastern Turkey. Situated on the “Silk Road” between the Roman Empire and the East, Edessa was refounded by Seleucus Nicator in 303 bce. A Nabatean dynasty ruled from the 1st cent.