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Ecbatana
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Ecbatana
Ecbatana (אחמתא‎, 'chmt'). Capital of Media; one of five capitals of Achaemenid Persia. Modern Hamadān is located on the ancient site. Ecbatana was the capital of the Median Empire. It was also a royal residence for the Achaemenid Persians and Parthians.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Ecbatana (Place)
ECBATANA (PLACE) [Aram ʾaḥmĕtāʾ (אַחְמְתָא)]. Place located in the Zagros mountains of NW Iran between Tehran and Baghdad which was the capital of the Median Empire (Ezra 6:2). The name derives from an Old Persian expression (hagmatāna); Gk ekbatana) meaning “gathering place.” At the foot of Mt.
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Ecbatana
Ecbatana. Greek name for the capital of the ancient Median empire, later one of the capital cities of the Persian and Parthian empires. It is often spelled Achmetha (Ezr 6:2 kjv), approximating its Aramaic name. The Old Persian name, Hangmatana, may have meant “place of assembly.” Modern Hamadan covers
Achmetha
Achmetha. kjv form of Ecbatana, a Persian city, in Ezra 6:2.See Ecbatana.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Ecbatana
Ecbatana ek-ba’tə-nə [Aram ʾaḥmeṯāʾ (Ezr. 6:2); Gk. Amatha; Pesh Syr. ʾaḥmāṯān; Tiglath-pileser’s inscr. (ca. 1100 b.c.) Amadāna; Darius’ Behistun inscr. ii.76–78 Hañgmatāna—‘place of assembly’; Herodotus Agbatana; Xenophon Ekbatana; so 1 Esd. 6:23; Tob. 3:7; 6:5; 7:1; 14:12, 14; Jth. 1:1f,
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Ecbatana
ECBATANA Greek name for the capital of the ancient Median Empire, later one of the capital cities of the Persian and Parthian empires. It is often spelled Achmetha (Ezr 6:2, kjv), approximating its Aramaic name. The Old Persian name, Hangmatana, may have meant “place of assembly.” Modern Hamadan covers
Achmetha
ACHMETHA* kjv form of Ecbatana, a Persian city, in Ezra 6:2. See Ecbatana.
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Achmetha
ACHMETHA. A city reaching at least back to the days of Cyrus (about 550 b.c.). Here the decrees of Cyrus were found that authorized the Jews to rebuild the temple at Jerusalem (Ezr 6:2). The city is on high elevation (about 6,000 ft.) and thereby provided a good summer resort. Darius I may have used
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Ecbatana (Av Achmetha)
ECBATANA (AV ACHMETHA), mod. Hamadan. The former capital of the Median empire, it became the summer residence of the Persian kings after *Cyrus had founded the *Persian empire (c. 540 bc). Herodotus (1.98) and Judith 1:1–4 describe the magnificence of the city. The decree of Cyrus (Ezr. 6:3–5), authorizing
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Ecbatana
Ecbatana (Gk. Ekbatana; O. Pers. hagmatāna; Aram. ʾaḥmĕṯāʾ)Graecized name of Hagmatana (modern Hamadan), the main city in Media. It occupies a strategic position in the main pass through the Alvand Alignment, the easternmost range of the Zagros Mountains before the Iranian plateau. Ecbatana lies
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Ecbatana
Ecbatana [ĕk bătˊə nə] (Aram. ˒aḥmeṯā˒; O. Pers. hagmatāna “place of gathering”[?]). Originally the capital city of Media, allegedly founded by King Deioces ca. 700 B.C. (so Herodotus Hist i.96); after capture by Cyrus the Great in 548, it became the summer residence of the Achaemenid rulers
The Archaeological Encyclopedia of the Holy Land
Achmetha
ACHMETHA The capital of the Medes (Madai) (Ezra 6:2), also named Ecbatana, and the summer capital of the Achaemenid Empire; today Hamadhan, in Iran. The city was conquered by Alexander the Great in 331 bc and remained a royal city under the Parthians and Sassanids. No systematic excavations have been
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Ecbatana
ECBATANA (Persian, “gathering place”) The capital city of the Medes, situated at the foot of Mount Orontes in the Zagros Mountains; ancient Ecbatana is identified with the modern city of Hamadan, in modern northwestern Iran between the cities of Tehran and Baghdad. The city was captured by Cyrus the
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Ecbatana
Ecbat´ana. Ezra 6:2, margin. In the apocryphal books Ecbatana is frequently mentioned. Two cities named Ecbatana seem to have existed in ancient times, one the capital of northern Media—the Media Atropatêné of Strabo—the other the metropolis of the larger and more important province known as Media Magna.