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Ebla Texts
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
Third millennium bc tablets unearthed at the royal palace of Ebla (Palace G). The largest cache of third millennium bc tablets discovered. Comparisons can made between the Ebla tablets and biblical names, cities, practices (including a scapegoat ritual), and the creation account.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Ebla Texts
Ebla Texts Third millennium bc tablets unearthed at the royal palace of Ebla (Palace G). The largest cache of third millennium bc tablets discovered. Comparisons can made between the Ebla tablets and biblical names, cities, practices (including a scapegoat ritual), and the creation account.
Ebla Texts, Critical Issues
Ebla Texts, Critical Issues Examines scholarly issues related to the third-millennium bc texts from the city of Ebla in ancient Syria. The so-called Ebla texts are an important source for studying the people not only of Ebla but of the greater ancient Near East.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Ebla Texts
EBLA TEXTS. The texts discovered at Ebla (Tell Mardikh in NW Syria), which constitute the largest single find of 3d millennium b.c. cuneiform texts so far recovered anywhere in the Near East. Estimates of the number of texts have varied widely and have not always taken into account the distinctions made
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Ebla Tablets
EBLA TABLETS* Tablets, dating c. 2220–2240 bc, discovered in the ancient Syrian city-state of Ebla, now identified with the site of Tell Mardikh.Ebla was a commercial center, manufacturing items of textiles, wood, ceramics, gold, silver, and other metals. A large number of the clay tablets unearthed
Baker Encyclopedia of Christian Apologetics
Ebla Tablets
Ebla Tablets. Sixteen thousand clay tablets from the third millennium b.c. were discovered at Ebla in modern Syria, beginning in 1974. Biovanni Pettinato dates them 2580–2450 b.c. and Paolo Matthiae suggests 2400–2250 b.c. Either period predates any other written material by hundreds of years.
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
EBLA TEXTS
EBLA TEXTS eb´luh. In the years between 1974 and 1976, an archaeological expedition from the University of Rome, directed by Paolo Matthiae, discovered a huge number of cuneiform tablets (estimated to have been originally about 2,500) at Tell Mardikh (ancient Ebla or Ibla) near Aleppo in Syria. The tablets