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Dry land
Geographical objects and features
Dictionaries
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Jeshimon (Place)
JESHIMON (PLACE) [Heb yĕšı̂môn (יְשִׁימֹון)]. A “desert” or “wasteland”; used in the OT for both desert areas in general (Deut 32:10; Isa 43:19, 20; Psalms 68:7; 78:40; 106:14; 107:4) and specific locations (Num 21:20; 23:28; 1 Sam 23:19, 24; 26:1, 3).1. The rugged barren band of land parallel to
Land
LAND. The frequent occurrence of various terms designating land, and the central role land plays in certain narratives, testify to the importance of this concept in the Bible. But while the concept is ubiquitous, the different units of the OT provide various ideological perspectives and theological nuances.
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Desert
Desert. Empty waste place, often arid, sandy, and incapable of sustaining vegetable life, as for example the Negeb of southern Palestine. A desert frequently includes local areas where marginal life is possible. The most common Hebrew term for desert means “wilderness,” and is perhaps related to a verb
Land
Land. The relationship of man to the land is a prominent theme in the OT. In Genesis the earth with its dry land was created as a place for man to dwell in fellowship with God. Man was given the task of subduing the earth and ruling over the animal creation to satisfy his own needs and to bring glory
Wilderness
Wilderness. Land that is basically wild, nonarable, and sparsely inhabited or unfit for permanent settlement. It may be desert, mountains, forest, or marsh.In the Near East the wilderness is characteristically dry, desolate, and mostly rock and sand. It is rough, uneven, and interlaced with dry watercourses.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Desert
Desert [Heb. miḏbār, arāḇâ, yešîmôn, ṣîyâ, ḥorbâ; Gk. erēmía, érēmos]; AV also WILDERNESS (esp for miḏbār), DRY PLACES (Ps. 105:41); NEB also DRY LAND, BARREN HEATH, PARCHED LAND, BARREN DESERT, “solitary places,” “lonely place”; AV translates yešîmôn as place name Jeshimon
Jeshimon (desert)
1. In the AV of Nu. 21:20; 23:28, and the NEB of 23:28, the desert N of the Dead Sea and E of the Jordan River. Pisgah overlooked this area, a bare and sterile land, saturated with salt and very little vegetation. In the RSV, and the NEB of 21:20, the word is translated “the desert.”
Land
Land[Heb ʾereṣ, also ʾaḏāmâ, śāḏeh—‘(open) field,’ geḇûl—‘boundary,’ ‘territory’ (1 S. 6:9; Ps. 78:54; Isa. 15:8; Ezk. 45:7), ḥēleq—‘share of property’ (2 K. 3:19, 25; Am. 7:4), karmel—‘orchard’ (“fruitful land,” Isa. 10:18; Jer. 4:26; “fertile land,” 2 Ch. 26:10), mig̱raš (“pasture land,”
Wilderness
Wilderness [Heb. miḏbār] (Gen. 14:6; 16:7; 21:14, 20f.; etc.); AV also DESERT (e.g., Ex. 3:1), SOUTH (Ps. 75:6); NEB also DESERT (e.g., Nu. 21:5), PASTURES, OPEN PASTURES (e.g., Ezk. 34:25), OPEN (Joel 1:19f), WASTE (e.g., Joel 3:19 [MT 4:19]), WILD (Jer. 23:10), “inhospitable” (Jer. 2:31); [yešîmôn]
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Desert
DESERT Empty waste place, often arid, sandy, and incapable of sustaining vegetable life, as for example the Negev of southern Palestine. A desert frequently includes local areas where marginal life is possible. The most common Hebrew term for desert means “wilderness” and is perhaps related to a verb
Land
LAND The relationship of humans to the land is a prominent theme in the OT. In Genesis the earth with its dry land was created as a place for humans to dwell in fellowship with God. Humans were given the task of subduing the earth and ruling over the animal creation to satisfy their own needs and to
Wilderness
WILDERNESS Land that is basically wild and sparsely inhabited or unfit for permanent human settlement. It may be desert, mountains, forest, or marsh.In the Near East the wilderness is characteristically dry, desolate, and mostly rock and sand. It is rough, uneven, and interlaced with dry watercourses.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Desert
desert, an area inhospitable to human habitation. In the Middle East, “absolute desert,” i.e., a region where rain almost never falls, is found only in the Sahara, the peninsula of Arabia, and Iran. The deserts of Israel, Syria, Transjordan, and Sinai are all “tame deserts,” with a little rain every
Land
land (Heb. ’erets; also “earth,” “country”; less often ’adamah, also “ground,” “soil,” in contrast to “wilderness”), a term occurring in the Hebrew Bible nearly 1,750 times (nrsv). When it refers to a specific geographic region, it is usually phrased in possessive relation to the people inhabiting it.
Wilderness
wilderness. The Hebrew word (midbar) that is usually translated “wilderness” in the Bible refers both to something that is “desolate and deserted” and something that is “beyond,” i.e., beyond the limits of settlement and therefore of government control. Thus, a wilderness was not defined by geographic
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Desert
A typical scene in the Wilderness of Judea. HFVDESERT. Various Heb. words are translated “desert” or “wilderness” in the KJV of the OT. Midbār, the most common, is found approximately 280 times. It is usually translated “wilderness” (q.v.) but 12 times is rendered “desert.” The word derives from
Wilderness
WILDERNESS. barren wasteland. The word is used often in a general geographical sense, but there are a number of areas specifically called wildernesses, e.g., Shur, Zin, Paran, Kadesh (q.v.).Several Heb. words vary the description of these areas. The most common word, midbār, means a pastureland, an
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Wilderness
WILDERNESS. In Scripture the words rendered ‘wilderness’ or ‘desert’ include not only the barren deserts of sand dunes or rock that colour the popular imagination of a desert, but also steppe-lands and pasture lands suitable for grazing livestock.The commonest Heb. word is miḏbār, a word already well-attested
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Desert
DesertArid environment hostile to life. In the Bible, desert functions thematically as a place of revelation and a training ground for faith and obedience, in preparation for mission.Desert is an arid region (mean annual precipitation of 25 cm. [10 in.] or less), with sparse vegetation, few animals,
Land
LandThe prominence of land in biblical thought has been underestimated in much 20th-century scholarship because of its strong emphasis on the historical character of biblical religion. According to this emphasis, biblical religion is about human redemption, and its God is revealed and recognized in
Wilderness
WildernessLiterally, a place not inhabited by human beings. As such, it came to be considered the natural habitation of demons (Matt. 12:43; Luke 8:29). The word does not necessarily imply a bleak, desert area, only one not inhabited by human beings.By far the majority of biblical references are to
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Desert
Desert. †A barren or partially barren geographical area, usually produced by low rainfall (e.g., the Sinai desert); also a symbol of aridity and desolation.The most common Hebrew word for “desert” is miḏbār (cf. Aram. dbr “bring the flock to the pasture”), indicating a barren area resembling
Land
Land (Heb. ˒ereṣ; Gk. gḗ).† In biblical usage “land” designates territory defined for political purposes, and represents the source of produce that sustains people and animals. In Hebrew cosmology land is the antithesis of “heaven,” and it takes on special theological significance with regard
Wilderness
Wilderness (Heb. miḏbār, ˓arāḇâ, yešîmôn; Gk. erēmiˊa, érēmos). In general, geographical regions beyond the limits of civilization and widely perceived as disorderly and inhospitable. Such areas include desert wastelands (Deut. 32:10; Ps. 106:14), thorny patches (Judg. 8:7, 16), rocky
Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels
Mountain and Wilderness
Mountain and wildernessIn the Gospels geographical facts are the vehicles of literary and theological ideas. What matters primarily is not on which mountain or in what part of the wilderness any particular event occurred but the typological or symbolic significance of a given location.1. Mountain2.
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Desert
DESERT Today, scientists define a desert as a place of arid conditions with annual rainfall of less than 10 inches (25 centimeters). Generally, vegetation, animal life, and water are scarce. The deserts in the Bible are all part of the vast Saharo-Arabian desert chain. The Sinai desert is described aptly
Dictionary of the Later New Testament & Its Developments
Land in Early Christianity
Land in Early ChristianityThe land of Israel belonged to Judaism’s understanding of itself. Early Christianity’s identity, however, was not closely tied to the land, and the NT focuses not on the holiness of a place but the holiness of a person, Jesus Christ; in Christian literature christology displaces