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Docetism
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A theological outlook in the early Christian period that maintained that Jesus did not take on a physical body, and thus only appeared to live a bodily existence and to die on the cross. It was rejected by the early church fathers as a heretical interpretation of the incarnation of Jesus Christ.
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The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Docetism
Docetism A theological outlook in the early Christian period that maintained that Jesus did not take on a physical body, and thus only appeared to live a bodily existence and to die on the cross. It was rejected by the early church fathers as a heretical interpretation of the incarnation of Jesus Christ.
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Docetism
DocetismA designation for various views regarding the humanity of Christ that began to manifest themselves in the late 1st century c.e. The term is related to Gk. dokeɩ́n, “to seem.” Docetic thought is a by-product of the Hellenistic environment of early Christianity that, philosophically, made a radical
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Docetism
Docetism [dŏsˊə tĭzˊəm]. An early teaching, regarded as heretical, according to which Christ’s incarnation (i.e., taking human form) was only a matter of appearance (Gk. dokéō “seem”). Thus his suffering, death, and resurrection were aspects of the human Jesus’ life in which the divine Christ did
Dictionary of the Later New Testament & Its Developments
Docetism
Docetism“Docetic” derives from the common Greek verb dokein (“seem, appear”). This verb and the nouns dokēsis and dokētai in the plural are used in early Christian literature of a variety of teachings about Jesus Christ that are united perhaps solely in denying that the divine Redeemer, by whatever
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Docetism
Docetism (Gk. δοκέω, ‘I seem’). In the early Church, a tendency, rather than a formulated and unified doctrine, which considered the humanity and sufferings of the earthly Christ as apparent rather than real. Evidence for its existence is to be found in the NT (1 Jn. 4:1–3; 2 Jn. 7; cf. Col. 2:8f),
Baker Encyclopedia of Christian Apologetics
Docetism
Docetism. Docetism (Gk. dokein, “to seem”) was a late-first-century heresy asserting that Jesus only seemed to be human (Kelly, 141). Docetism is “The assertion that Christ’s human body was a phantasm, and that his suffering and death were mere appearances. ‘If he suffered he was not God; if he was God
The Dictionary of Historical Theology
Docetism
DocetismDocetism is the name given to the idea that the humanity of Jesus Christ was an appearance or illusion. The term comes from the Greek dokein, ‘to seem’ or ‘to appear’, and its cognates. About 115 Ignatius of Antioch (or someone using his name about 150) denounces the view that Jesus suffered
Ecclesiastical Dictionary: Containing, in Concise Form, Information upon Ecclesiastical, Biblical, Archæological, and Historical Subjects
Docetæ
Docetæ.—Heretics in the early Church. They denied the reality of the human form and nature of Jesus Christ, and consequently the mystery of His Incarnation. The Docetæ, or Phantasiasts, as they were also called, granted to Christ only a seeming body and maintained that His sufferings and death were only
Pocket Dictionary of Church History: Over 300 Terms Clearly and Concisely Defined
Docetism
docetism. An early Christian heresy associated with *Gnosticism, docetism denied the material nature of Christ and thus his true humanity. The term is derived from the Greek word dokeo, which means “to seem,” or “to appear,” and thus a docetic view would be that Christ only appeared to be human. A leading
A Dictionary of Christian Biography, Literature, Sects and Doctrines, Volumes I–IV
Docetism
DOCETISM, the doctrine that our blessed Lord had a body like ours, only in appearance, not in reality. The rise of this notion was very early. St. Jerome scarcely exaggerates when he says (Adv. Lucif. 23) that “while the apostles were still surviving, while Christ’s blood was still fresh in Judaea, the
Dictionary of Theological Terms
Docetism
DocetismAn early heresy about the person of Christ. The Docetae took their name from the Greek verb dokeo, “to seem, appear,” and taught that Christ merely seemed to be a man. The first known advocate of Docetism was Cerinthus, who lived in the first century a.d.
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 2, D–G
Docetism
Docetism doh’suh-tiz’uhm (from δοκέω G1506, “to seem”). The view, associated with Gnosticism, that Jesus did not have a physical body and thus only appeared to die on the cross. This opinion appeared so early in the history of Christianity that there is an answer for it in 1 Jn. 4:2 and 2 Jn. 7. The
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