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Disciples at Lydda
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Aeneas
Aeneas (Αἰνέας, Aineas). A bedridden paralytic in Lydda who was miraculously healed by Peter in the name of Jesus (Acts 9:33–34).
Peter the Apostle
Peter the Apostle (Πέτρος, Petros). An apostle of Jesus Christ and one of the three named pillars of the early church in Jerusalem. Peter was the first Christian missionary to the Gentiles, a Christian missionary to the Jews, and a Christian martyr in Rome. Also called Cephas.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Aeneas (Person)
AENEAS (PERSON) [Gk Aineas (Αἰνεας)]. A man at Lydda, bed-ridden with paralysis, whom Peter was instrumental in healing (Acts 9:32–35). This person is not otherwise attested, though the name itself is fairly common and is found in Greek classical writers and in Josephus (Ant 14.10.22).Herbert G. Grether
Peter (Person)
PETER (PERSON) [Gk Petros (Πετρος)]. Var. SIMON PETER; SIMON; CEPHAS. The most prominent of the 12 disciples of Jesus.A. Pauline LettersB. Book of ActsC. Gospel of MarkD. Gospel of MatthewE. Gospel of LukeF. Gospel of JohnG. The Petrine EpistlesH. The Apocryphal WritingsA. Pauline LettersThere
Simeon (Person)
SIMEON (PERSON) [Heb šimʿôn (שִׁמְעֹון)]. SIMEONITE. 1. The second son of Leah and Jacob and the full brother of Reuben, Levi, Judah, Issachar, Zebulun, and Dinah. Simeon is also the eponymous ancestor of the tribe whose territory is found within the S limits of Judah. The etymology is obscure, but
Simon (Person)
SIMON (PERSON) [Gk Simōn (Σιμων)]. The name of a number of persons mentioned both in the Apocryphal literature of the OT as well as in the NT.1. Simon Chosamaeus (Gk Chosamaios), who provided a list of those who were found to have married foreign wives (1 Esdr 9:32; cf. Shimeon in Ezra 10:31).2. Simon
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Aeneas
Aeneas. Bedridden paralytic in Lydda who was miraculously healed by the apostle Peter. Many people became Christians as a result (Acts 9:33–35).
Cephas
Cephas. Aramaic name of Simon Peter the apostle in John 1:42; 1 Corinthians 1:12; and Galatians 1:18.See Peter, The Apostle.
Lydda
Lydda. NT name for Lod, a town located southwest of Jerusalem in the Shephelah.See Lod.
Peter, The Apostle
Peter, The Apostle. One of Jesus’ 12 disciples who rose to preeminence both among the disciples during Jesus’ ministry and among the apostles afterwards. There are actually four forms of his name in the NT: the Hebrew/Greek Simeon/Simon and the Aramaic/Greek Cephas/Petros. His given name was Simon bar-Jonah
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Aeneas
Aeneas ə-nēʹəs [GK. Aineas]. A paralytic at Lydda, who, after he “had been bedridden for eight years,” was miraculously healed by Peter (Acts 9:33f).
Cephas
Cephas sēʹfəs [Gk. ho Kēphas < Aram kêp̱ā’—‘rock’] (Jn. 1:42, etc.). The Aramaic surname of Peter.
Lod Lydda
Lod Lydda lod; LYDDA lidʹə [Heb. lōḏ; Gk. Lydda]. A Benjaminite town located in the picturesque plain of Sharon 18 km (11 mi) SE of Joppa. The name’s earliest appearance is in the inscription of Thutmose III (1482–1450 b.c.) at Karnak, which lists it among the Palestinian towns held by Egypt. In 1
Peter
Peter [Gk. Petros, for Kēphas < Aram kêp̱āʾ]. A disciple of Jesus and apostle of the early Church.The NT literature gives prominent place to Peter, whose life and ministry fall conveniently into the three categories indicated by O. Cullmann’s comprehensive study, Peter: Disciple-Apostle-Martyr.
Simon (NT)
2. Simon Peter; son of John (Jn. 1:42; 21:15–17; Jona, Mt. 16:17) and brother of Andrew (Jn. 1:40). See Peter.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Aeneas
AENEAS Bedridden paralytic in Lydda who was miraculously healed by the apostle Peter (Acts 9:33–35).
Cephas
CEPHAS Aramaic name of Simon Peter the apostle in John 1:42; 1 Corinthians 1:12; and Galatians 1:18. See Simon Peter.
Lydda
LYDDA New Testament name for Lod, a town located southwest of Jerusalem in the Shephelah (Acts 9:32–38). See Lod.
Peter, the Apostle
PETER, THE APOSTLE One of the 12 disciples; rose to prominence both among the disciples during Jesus’ ministry and among the apostles afterwards.There are actually four forms of Peter’s name in the New Testament: the Hebrew translated into Greek, “Simeon” to “Simon,” and the Aramaic translated into
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Aeneas
Aeneas (i-nee´uhs), a paralytic at Lydda who was healed by Peter (Acts 9:33–35).
Cephas
Cephas (see´fuhs; from Aramaic kepha’, “rock”), a surname equivalent to the Greek name “Peter” (John 1:42; cf. Matt. 16:17–18). See also Peter.
Lydda
Lydda (lid´uh), a town in the fertile Plain of Sharon along an eastern branch of the ancient international highway, the Via Maris. This location gave Lydda a certain strategic and commercial importance. First mentioned as Lydda in a Late Bronze Age list of towns in Canaan conquered by Thutmose III of
Peter
Peterpeter was a galilean and one of the twelve disciples of Jesus. His given name was Simon, but Jesus bestowed upon him the nickname “Peter” (GK., “rock”; Matt. 10:2; Mark 3:16; Luke 6:14). He is sometimes referred to as Cephas, the Aramaic version of that name, which Jesus would no doubt have actually
Simeon
Simeon (sim´ee-uhn; Heb., “to hear”).1 The second son of Jacob and Leah (Gen. 29:33). Simeon and his brother Levi massacred the men of Shechem to avenge the rape of their sister, Dinah (Gen. 34, recalled in Jth. 9:1–4). Simeon was later held hostage in Egypt when Joseph sent the other brothers back
Simon
Simon (si´muhn).1 Simon Maccabeus, the son of Mattathias Hashmon and ruler of Judea 142–134 bce. Following in the tradition of his brothers Judas Maccabeus and Jonathan, he led the Jewish forces against the Seleucids and won independence for Judea, establishing the Hasmonean dynasty, which would endure
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Aeneas
AENEAS. The name of a paralytic “sick of the palsy” and bedridden for eight years whom Peter healed, saying, “Jesus Christ maketh thee whole” (Acts 9:32–35). The healing resulted in a great spritual awakening at both Lydda and Sharon. It illustrates very well the purpose of NT miracles as an attestation
Cephas
CEPHAS (Gr. kēphas, from Aram. kēpa˒, “rock or stone”).A name given by Jesus to the apostle Simon (Jn 1:42; 1 Cor 1:12; 3:22; 9:5; 15:5; Gal 2:9). Peter is the Gr. equivalent of Cephas. See Peter; Simon; Simeon.
Lydda
LYDDA. A town in the old tribal area of Benjamin, about 11 miles SE of Joppa. Its OT name was Lod (1 Chr 8:12) and today is known as Ludd. The church in Lydda may have been started by Philip as he evangelized northward after meeting the Ethiopian eunuch (Acts 8:40). Peter healed the palsied man Aeneas
Peter
PETER. One of the earliest and most prominent disciples of Jesus. Several names are given him: the Heb. name Simeon (Acts 15:14) and Gr. Simon, after a son of Jacob whose descendants became one of the tribes of Israel; Cephas (Jn 1:43) and Peter, both meaning “rock.” See Simeon; Simon; Cephas.Origin
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Lydda
LYDDA. A town some 18 km SE of the coast at Jaffa, in the Shephelah plain. It is almost certainly to be identified with the OT Lod, which is mentioned in the Karnak list of Thothmes III. In Israelite times it was a Benjaminite town; reoccupied after the Bab. Exile, it later fell to the authority of the
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Aeneas
Aeneas (Gk. Ainéas)A man from Lydda who had been bedridden for eight years before Peter healed him of his paralysis (Acts 9:33–35).
Cephas
Cephas (Gk. Kēphás)Nickname or surname given the Apostle Peter (from Aram. kêp̱āʾ, “rock”).See Peter.
Lydda
Lydda (Gk. Lýdda)A city (modern Lod/el-Ludd; 140151) 18 km. (11 mi.) SE of Joppa, known in the OT as Lod. During the Hellenistic period, Lod became known as Lydda, and was the capital of one of the 11 districts of Judea after having been transferred from Samaritan control (1 Macc. 11:34). Years later
Peter
Peter (Gk. Pétros)Simon bar Jonah, nicknamed Cephas or Peter (Aramaic and Greek for “rock”) by Jesus. Since Simon was a common Jewish name and a number of others are mentioned in the Gospels and Acts, the nickname became the common designation for the man, although the Gospels report Jesus often calling
Simeon
Simeon (Heb. šimʿôn)1. The second son of Jacob (Gen. 35:23); the eponymous ancestor of the tribe whose territory was within the southern limits of Judah (Josh. 19:1–9). Simeon and his brother Levi exacted treacherous and violent revenge for the rape of their sister Dinah by a local prince called Shechem
Simon
Simon (Gk. Sɩ́mon; Heb. šimʿôn)1. Simon, surnamed the Just (Gk. dikaios, also meaning “righteous”), who according to Josephus (Ant. 12.43) succeeded his father Onias in the high priesthood. This places him within the period of Ptolemy I’s rule over Judea (301–282 b.c.e.). A scholion to Megillat Taʿanit
Symeon
Symeon (Gk. Symên)1. A prophet and teacher in the church at Antioch who was surnamed Niger and may have been, therefore, black (Lat. niger; Acts 13:1 RSV; NRSV “Simeon” [6]).2. Another name for Simon Peter (Acts 15:14; 2 Pet. 1:1 RSV).
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Aeneas
Aeneas [ĭ nēˊəs] (Gk. Aineas). A man from Lydda who had been bedridden for eight years before Peter healed him of his paralysis (Acts 9:32–35). He may have been a member of a local group of Christians.
Cephas
Cephas [sēˊfəs] (Gk. Kēphas, from Aram. kêp̱ā˒ “rock”). See Peter.
Lydda
Lydda [1ĭdˊə)] (Gk. Λψδδα). Old Testament Lod, a city ca. 18 km. (11 mi.) southeast of Joppa (cf. Acts 9:38). Resettled following the return from exile (Ezra 2:33; Neh. 7:37; 11:35), the city became known as Lydda in Hellenistic times (the name occurs in a conquest list of Thutmose III, ca.
Peter
Peter [pēˊtər] (Gk. Petros).† Simon Peter, the most prominent of Jesus’ twelve disciples.
The Archaeological Encyclopedia of the Holy Land
Lod; Lydda; Diospolis
LOD; LYDDA; DIOSPOLIS A town not mentioned in the Bible until the Restoration (Ezra 2:23, etc.), though its inclusion in a list of Tuthmosis III testifies to its antiquity. In 145 bc it was included in Hasmonean territory. In ad 68 it was conquered by Vespasian, and after the fall of Jerusalem it was
Dictionary of Deities and Demons in the Bible
Aeneas
AENEAS Αἰνέας/ΑἰνείαςI. Aeneas, already a prominent Trojan hero in Homer’s Iliad, is best known to us as the central figure of Virgil’s Aeneid, whose task it is to create the Roman identity and destiny. His name occurs as that of the paralysed man cured by Peter at Acts 9:33–34. The name appears