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Dionysus
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Dionysus
Dionysus (Διόνυσος, Dionysos). The Greek god of wine, merry-making, and insanity. The son of Zeus and Semele. Also known as Bacchus (Βάκχος, Bakchos) or Bromius.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Dionysus (Deity)
DIONYSUS (DEITY) [Gk Dionysos (Διονυσος)]. The Greek god of wine and ecstatic experience generally, and to some extent also of vegetation, and of death and rebirth. He was also remarkable as being subject to birth (from a mortal woman), death, and resurrection.He is a peculiar phenomenon and something
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Dionysus
Dionysus dī-ə-nīʹsəs [Gk. Dionysos]. A Greek deity, mentioned in biblical literature only in the Apocrypha (2 Macc. 6:7; 14:33) as the object of a cult that Nicanor and Antiochus Epiphanes tried to force upon their Jewish subjects.Dionysus was not one of the original Olympian gods, but was introduced
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Dionysus
Dionysus (Gk. Diónysos)The Greek vegetation deity (Roman Bacchus), worshipped primarily as god of wine. His great festival was known as the Dionysia (Greece) or Bacchanalia (Rome), but Dionysiac festivals were held at different times in various locales. Worship involved ecstatic, even orgiastic behavior.
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Dionysus
Dionysus [dīˊə nīˊsəs] (Gk. Dionysos).* The Greek god of vegetation, particularly associated with the vine and ivy. Alternately known as Bacchus (so KJV), he was introduced into Greece from Thrace or Phrygia. In Greek mythology he is depicted as dying and rising annually; thus he became associated
Dictionary of Deities and Demons in the Bible
Dionysus
DIONYSUS ΔιόνυσοςI. Dionysos, the Greek god of ecstasy, bears a name of uncertain etymology, although resembling the usual Greek types of anthroponyms (e.g. Dio-doros, “gift from Zeus”). Accordingly, ancient authors agree to see the name of Zeus (gen. Διός) in the first half; some understood -νυσος
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
DIONYSUS, (BACCHUS)
DIONYSUS, (BACCHUS)<di-o-ni’-sus> ([Διόνυσος, Dionusos]): The youngest of the Greek gods. In Homer he is not associated with the vine. In later Greek legend he is represented as coming from India, as traversing Asia in a triumphal march, accompanied by woodland beings, with pointed ears, snub noses
DIONYSIA
DIONYSIA<di-o-nish’-i-a> ([Διονύσια, Dionusia], “festivals of Dionysus” (Bacchus)): The rural (vintage) Dionysia were celebrated in the month of Poseideon (19th day), which is roughly our December. The celebration consisted of feasts, processions, songs and (sometimes) scenic performances. The Ascolia
Compton’s Encyclopedia
Dionysus
DionysusOne of the most widely worshiped gods of Greek mythology was Dionysus. At first, he was considered only as the god of wine. Later he became the god of vegetation and warm moisture, and, eventually, the god of pleasures and of civilization.Dionysus was the son of Zeus and Semele, who was daughter
Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, Volumes I–III
ACRATOPHORUS
ACRATO′PHORUS (Ἀκρατοφόρος), a surname of Dionysus, by which he was designated as the giver of unmixed wine, and worshipped at Phigaleia in Arcadia. (Paus. viii. 39. § 4.)[L. S.]
ACROREITES
ACROREITES (Ἀκρωρείτης), a surname of Dionysus, under which he was worshipped at Sicyon, and which is synonymous with Eriphius, under which name he was worshipped at Metapontum in southern Italy. (Steph. Byz. s. v. Ἀκρωρεία.)[L. S.]
AEGOBOLUS
AEGO′BOLUS (Αἰγοβόλος), the goat-killer, a surname of Dionysus, at Potniae in Boeotia. (Paus. ix. 8. § 1.)[L. S.]
AESYMNETES
AESYMNE′TES (Αἰσυμνήτης), a surname of Dionysus, which signifies the Lord, or Ruler, and under which he was worshipped at Aroë in Achaia. The story about the introduction of his worship there is as follows: There was at Troy an ancient image of Dionysus, the work of Hephaestus, which Zeus had once
AGRIONIUS
AGRIO′NIUS (Ἀγριώνιος), a surname of Dionysus, under which he was worshipped at Orchomenus in Boeotia, and from which his festival Agrionia in that place derived its name. (Dict. of Ant. p. 30; Müller, Orchom. p. 166, &c.)[L. S.]
ANTHEUS
ANTHEUS (Ἀνθεύς), the blooming, a surname of Dionysus. (Paus. vii. 21. § 2.) Anthius, a surname which Dionysus bore at Athens, is probably only a different form for Antheus. (Paus. i. 31. § 2.) There are also two fabulous personages of this name. (Hygin. Fab. 157; Virg. Aen. i. 181, 510, xii. 443.)
BASSAREUS
BA′SSAREUS (Βασσαρεύς), a surname of Dionysus (Hor. Carm. i. 18. 11; Macrob. Sat. i. 18), which, according to the explanations of the Greeks, is derived from βασσάρα, or βασσαρίς, the long robe which the god himself and the Maenads used to wear in Thrace, and whence the Maenads themselves are often
BRISAEUS
BRISAEUS (Βρισαῖος), a surname of Dionysus, derived from mount Brisa in Lesbos (Steph. Byz. s. v. Βρίσα), or from a nymph Brisa, who was said to have brought up the god. (Schol. ad Pers. Sat. i. 76.)[L. S.]
CRESIUS
CRE′SIUS (Κρήσιος), a surname of Dionysus at Argos, where he had a temple in which Ariadne was said to be buried. (Paus. ii. 23. § 7.)[L. S.]
DENDRITES
DENDRI′TES (Δενδρίτης), the god of the tree, a surname of Dionysus, which has the same import as Dasyllius, the giver of foliage. (Plut. Sympos. 5; Paus. i. 43. § 5.)[L. S.]
ELEUTHEREUS
ELEUTHEREUS (Ἐλευθερεύς), a surname of Dionysus, which he derived either from Eleuther, or the Boeotian town of Eleutherae; but it may also be regarded as equivalent to the Latin Liber, and thus describes Dionysus as the deliverer of man from care and sorrow. (Paus. i. 20. § 2, 38. § 8; Plut. Quaest.
LAPHYSTIUS
LAPHY′STIUS (Λαφύστιος). 1. A surname of Zeus, which was derived either from Mount Laphystius in Boeotia, or from the verb λαφύσσειν, to flee, so that it would be synonymous with φύξιος: a third opinion is, that it signified “the voracious,” in reference to the human sacrifices which were offered
LENAEUS
LENAEUS (Ληναῖος), a surname of Dionysus, derived from ληνός, the wine-press or the vintage. (Hesych. s. v.; Virg. Georg. ii. 4. 529; Dict. of Ant. s. v. Lenaea.)[L. S.]
LYSIUS
LY′SIUS (Λύσιος), i. e. the Deliverer, a surname of Dionysus, under which he was worshipped at Corinth, where there was a carved image of the god, the whole figure of which was gilt, while the face was painted red. (Paus. ii. 2. § 5.) He was also worshipped at Sicyon, where the Theban Phanes was said
NYSAEUS
NYSAEUS, NY′SIUS, NYSEUS, or NYSI′GENA (Νυσήϊος), a surname of Dionysus, derived from Nysa, a mountain or city, either in Thrace, Arabia, or India, where he was said to have been brought up by nymphs. According to some, it was derived from Nisus, who is said to have been his father, or at least to
OMADIUS
OMA′DIUS (Ὠμάδιος), that is, the flesh-eater, a surname of Dionysus, to whom human sacrifices were offered in Chios and Tenedos. (Orph. Hymn. 51. 7; Porphyr. de Abstin. ii. 55.)[L. S.]
PHLEON
PHLEON (Φλέων), i. e. the giver of plenty, is a surname of Dionysus, describing the god as promoting the fertility of plants and trees. (Aelian, V. H. iii. 41.) A similar surname of the god is Phlyus (from φλύειν; Schol. ad Apollon. Rhod. i. 115.)[L. S.]
PSILAS
PSILAS (Ψιλᾶς), i. e. “the giver of wings,” or “the unbearded,” a surname of Dionysus, under which he was worshipped at Amyclae. (Paus. iii. 19. § 6; Lobeck ad Phrynich. p. 435.)[L. S.]
TAUROCEPHALUS
TAUROCE′PHALUS (Ταυροκέφαλος, also Ταυρόκρανος, Ταυρομέτωπος, &c.), a surname of Dionysus in the Orphic mysteries. (Orph. Hymn. 51. 2; comp. Taurus.) It also occurs as a surname of rivers and the ocean, who were symbolically represented as bulls, to indicate their fertilising effect upon countries.
TAURUS
TAURUS (Ταῦρος), a bull, occurs: 1. as a surname of Dionysus. (Eurip. Bacch. 918; Athen. xi. p. 476; Plut. Quaest. Graec. 36; Lycoph. Cass. 209.)2. According to some, another name for Talos. (Apollod. i. 9. § 26.)3. A son of Neleus and Chloris. (Apollod. i. 9. § 9.)[L. S.]
ZAGREUS
ZAGREUS (Ζαγρεύς), a surname of the mystic Dionysus (Διόνυσος χθόνιος), whom Zeus, in the form of a dragon, is said to have begotten by Persephone, previously to her being carried off by Pluto (Callim. Fragm. 171, ed. Bentl.; Etym. Magn. s. v.; Orph. Hymn. 29; Ov. Met. vi. 114; Nonnius, Dionys. vi.
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 2, D–G
Dionysus
Dionysus di’uh-ni’suhs (Διόνυσος). Also called Bacchus. The god of an ecstatic and emotional cult, which appears to have reached Greece from Thrace (Thracia). The cult satisfied that strange and somewhat terrifying urge in human nature that found expression also in the “dancing madness,” which periodically
Dionysia
Dionysia di’uh-nish’ee-uh (Διονύσια). A series of festivals that honored Dionysus, the god of wine. The first of the feasts was the Oschophoria in the month of Pysanepsion (October to November), which celebrated the ripening of the grapes. The running of races, making of processions, and singing of
The Eerdmans Encyclopedia of Early Christian Art and Archaeology, Volumes 1–3
Dionysos
DionysosGreek god, twice born (once of a human mother, Semele, a second time of Persephone, goddess of the underworld). The epithets and attributes of D. are numerous. There are two aetiological traditions, the one Thracian, the other Lydian/Phrygian (Nilsson, 1957, 1:564ff.). D. was a powerful and
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Dionysus, (Bacchus)
DIONYSUS, dī-ō̇-nīʹsus (BACCHUS) (Διόνυσος, Diónusos): The youngest of the Gr gods. In Homer he is not associated with the vine. In later Gr legend he is represented as coming from India, as traversing Asia in a triumphal march, accompanied by woodland beings, with pointed ears, snub noses and goat-tails.
Dionysia
DIONYSIA, dī-ō̇-nishʹi-a (Διονύσια, Dionúsia, “festivals of Dionysus” [Bacchus]): The rural (vintage) Dionysia were celebrated in the month of Poseideon (19th day), which is roughly our December. The celebration consisted of feasts, processions, songs and (sometimes) scenic performances. The Ascolia