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Dill
Anise • Anise or Dill • Fitch • Fitches
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Dill
Dill. Herb from an annual plant known in Bible times. Dill has been widely used as a seasoning, especially for pickles, and for certain medicinal purposes. The kjv translation of “anise” instead of “dill” is considered incorrect by most scholars.See Plants.
Fitch
Fitch. kjv translation of two Hebrew words. “Fitch” is actually an older form of the word “vetch,” the name of many species of leguminous plants. The “fitch” of Isaiah 28:25, 27 (rsv dill) is the nutmeg flower, the seeds of which are used as a condiment. The “fitch” of Ezekiel 4:9 (rsv spelt) is probably
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Dill
Dill [Heb. qeṣaḥ; Gk. melánthion] (Isa. 28:25, 27); AV FITCHES; [Gk. ánēthon] (Mt. 23:23); AV ANISE. A weedy annual umbellifer (Anethum graveolens L.) resembling parsley; not the true anise (Pimpinella anisum L.). Dill was widely grown for its seeds, which have carminative and aromatic properties.
Fitches
Fitches Nigella sativa L., an annual of the buttercup family, popularly named “nutmeg-flower,” mentioned only in the AV (Isa. 28:25, 27; Ezk. 4:9). The seeds were used as a condiment in antiquity, having aromatic and carminative properties. As with other plants that yield their seed easily, the seeds
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Dill
DILL Herb from an annual plant known in Bible times. Dill has been widely used as a seasoning, especially for pickles, and for certain medicinal purposes. The kjv translation of “anise” instead of “dill” is considered incorrect by most scholars.See also Plants.
Fitch
FITCH* kjv translation of two Hebrew words. “Fitch” is actually an older form of the word “vetch,” the name of many species of leguminous plants. The “fitch” of Isaiah 28:25–27 (nlt “dill”) is the nutmeg flower, the seeds of which are used as a condiment. The “fitch” of Ezekiel 4:9 (nlt “spelt”) is probably
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Dill
dill, an aromatic plant used in cooking as a condiment and medicinally as a carminative and breath freshener. Paying a tithe on dill (Matt. 23:23) symbolizes scrupulous attention to details of ritual law.
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Dill
DillAn umbelliferous herb (Anethum graveolens L.) which resembles parsley (Heb. qeṣaḥ; Gk. ánēthon). The plant was cultivated for its oval-shaped brown seeds, which were used as a condiment in cooking and as a carminative medicine. According to m. Maʿak. 3:16 (Aram. šĕḇēṯa) the dill was subject
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Dill
Dill (Heb. qeṣaḥ; Gk. ánēthon). An umbelliferous herb (Anethum graveolens L.) which resembles parsley. The plant was cultivated for its oval-shaped brown seeds, which were used as a condiment in cooking and as a carminative medicine. According to the Mishnah (Ma˓as. iv.5; Aram. šeḇēṯa)
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Anise
Anise. This word occurs only in Matt. 23:23. It is by no means a matter of certainty whether the anise (Pimpinella anisum, Lin.) or the dill (Anethum graveolens) is here intended, though the probability is more in favor of the latter plant. “Anise is an annual plant growing to the height of one foot,
Fitches
Fitches (i.e., Vetches), without doubt the Nigella sativa, an herbaceous annual plant belonging to the natural order Ranunculaceœ (the butter-cup family), which grows in the south of Europe and in the north of Africa. Its black seeds are used like pepper, and have almost as pungent a taste. The Syrians
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Fitches
FITCHES. A KJV term, replaced in the NASB and NIV by cummin (Heb. qeṣah, “black cummin”; Isa. 28:25, 27) and spelt (Heb. kūssemet; Ezek. 4:9). See Vegetable Kingdom: Cummin; Spelt.
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Anise
AniseThis word is found only in Matt. 23:23. It is the plant commonly known by the name of dill, the Peucedanum graveolens of the botanist. This name dill is derived from a Norse word which means to soothe, the plant having the carminative property of allaying pain. The common dill, the Anethum graveolens,
Fitches
Fitches(Isa. 28:25, 27), the rendering of the Hebrew ketsah, “without doubt the Nigella sativa, a small annual of the order Ranunculacece, which grows wild in the Mediterranean countries, and is cultivated in Egypt and Syria for its seed.” It is rendered in margin of the Revised Version “black cummin.”
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Dill
Dilldill (kjv: ‘anise’), an aromatic plant used in cooking as a condiment and medicinally as a carminative and breath-freshener. Paying a tithe on dill (Matt. 23:23) symbolizes scrupulous attention to details of ritual law.
Fitch
Fitchfitch, a designation (kjv) for two plants. In Ezek. 4:9 it designates an inferior species of wheat (rsv: ‘spelt’), either Triticum spelta or Triticum dicoccoides. In Isa. 28:25, 27 it probably designates black cumin (rsv: ‘dill’) or ‘nutmeg flower’ (Nigella sativa) rather than the true cumin with
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
ANISE; DILL
ANISE; DILL<an’-is>, or <dil>; (RVm, [ἄνηθον, anethon]): Not the true anise, Pimpinella anisum, as was supposed by the King James Version translators, but Dill, Anethum graveolens. This is an annual or biennial herb of NO Umbelliferae, growing from one to three feet high, with small yellow flowers
FITCHES
FITCHES<fich’-iz> (the English word “fitch” is the same as “vetch”):1. [קֶצַח‎, qetsach] (Isa 28:25, 27; the Revised Version, margin has “black cummin” (Nigella sativa)). This is the “nutmeg flower,” an annual herb (Natural Order, Ranunculaceae), the black seeds of which are sprinkled over
Compton’s Encyclopedia
dill
dillDill is a fennel-like herb that is used to season foods, particularly in eastern Europe and Scandinavia. The entire plant is aromatic, and the leafy tops and dried, ripe fruit, or seeds, are used for flavoring soups, salads, sauces, fish, sandwich fillings, and particularly pickles. Dill has a warm,
anise
aniseAnise (Pimpinella anisum).A to Z Botanical Collection/EB Inc.Anise is an annual herb cultivated chiefly for its fruits, called aniseed, the flavor of which resembles that of licorice. Aniseed is widely used to flavor pastries. In the Mediterranean region and in Asia, aniseed is commonly used
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