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Didache
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
Also known as the Teaching of the Twelve Apostles, and known more fully as “The Teaching (Διδαχὴ, Didachē) of the Lord to the Gentiles through the Twelve Apostles.” An early Christian text dating to the first or second century ad that contains instructions about moral conduct and liturgy. Although viewed as noncanonical, the Didache did have some level of authority in the early church, and is part of a collection known as the Apostolic Fathers.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Didache, Critical Issues
Didache (Διδαχὴ, Didachē). Also known as the Teaching of the Twelve Apostles, and known more fully as “The Teaching (Διδαχὴ, Didachē) of the Lord to the Gentiles through the Twelve Apostles.” An early Christian text dating to the first or second century ad that contains instructions about moral conduct
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Didache
DIDACHE. An early work on Christian discipline, known also as the Teaching of the (Lord through the Twelve) Apostles (to the Nations). The only independent Gk manuscript (dated to 1056 c.e.) of this relatively compact handbook of Christian ethical (chaps. 1–6) and liturgical-community (chaps. 7–15) instructions,
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Didache (Teaching)
DIDACHE* (Teaching) A manual of church discipline, otherwise known as “The Teaching of the Lord to the Gentiles through the Twelve Apostles.” Its origin and date are difficult to determine precisely, but scholars generally agree that it was written in Syria or Palestine during the late first century
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Didache
Didache (Gk. Didachḗ)A common shorthand reference (Gk. “teaching”) for the early Christian writing entitled The Teaching of (the Lord to the Gentiles by) the Twelve Apostles. Divided by modern scholars into 16 brief chapters, this is a unique collection of early Christian sayings, liturgical traditions,
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Didache
Didache [dĭdˊə kĭ] (Gk. didachḗ “teaching”). The oldest known of the so-called church orders, the “Teaching of the Twelve Apostles”; it is reckoned among the books of the New Testament Apocrypha Originally composed in Greek, the earliest complete text of the Didache is an A.D. 1056 Syrian version
Dictionary of the Later New Testament & Its Developments
Didache, the
Didache, TheThe Teaching of the Lord to the Gentiles by the Twelve Apostles, or The Teaching of the (Twelve) Apostles, as it was known in ancient times, or simply the Didache (“The Teaching”), as it is usually known today, is a “handbook,” or manual of Christian ethical instruction and church order.
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
didache
didache (Gk. διδαχή, ‘teaching’). The elements in primitive Christian apologetic of an instructional kind, as contrasted with *kerygma or ‘preaching’.
Didache
Didache (Διδαχὴ Κυρίου διὰ τῶν δώδεκα ἀποστόλων), a short early Christian manual on morals and Church practice. Of its 16 brief chapters, chs. 1–6 describe the ‘Two Ways’, the ‘Way of Life’ and the ‘Way of Death’; they include quotations from the *Sermon on the Mount. Chs. 7–15 contain instructions
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Didache
DIDACHE [DID uh kay] (teaching) — a writing of the early church probably used as a manual of instruction to train converts to Christianity in doctrine and discipline before they were baptized. The date of its writing is uncertain, but it was probably put into its final form between a.d. 50 and 225.The
Pocket Dictionary of Church History: Over 300 Terms Clearly and Concisely Defined
Didache
Didache. A second-century manual on church practice and Christian ethics, the Didache, or The Teaching of the Lord Through the Twelve Apostles, offers the modern reader an invaluable glimpse of church life in the postapostolic period, including the practice of baptism, the Eucharist, fasting, prayer
Pocket Dictionary of Liturgy & Worship
Didache
Didache. Greek for “Teaching [of the Twelve Apostles]” and among the earliest postapostolic writings (parts perhaps predating some NT writings). A composite work that developed over time (first to second centuries), it is the earliest presentation of a *formal Christian liturgy, including baptism (chaps.