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Diatessaron
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
Diatessaron (διὰ τεσσάρων, dia tessarōn). A noncanonical harmony of the four Gospels, along with at least one extrabiblical source, written by Tatian around ad 172 (Petersen, “Tatian’s Diatessaron,” 403). The name Diatessaron is derived from the Greek phrase διὰ τεσσάρων (dia tessarōn), meaning “through four.” In the Diatessaron, Tatian harmonized parallel passages in the Gospels and removed apparent contradictions to form a single document.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Diatessaron
Diatessaron Diatessaron (διὰ τεσσάρων, dia tessarōn). A noncanonical harmony of the four Gospels, along with at least one extrabiblical source, written by Tatian around ad 172 (Petersen, “Tatian’s Diatessaron,” 403). The name Diatessaron is derived from the Greek phrase διὰ τεσσάρων (dia tessarōn), meaning
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Diatessaron
DIATESSARON. Diatessaron (Greek: dia tessaron (διὰ τεσσάρων): “through [the] four [Gospels]”) is the name given by Eusebius (Hist.Eccl. 4.29.6) to a “combination and collection” of the Gospels created by TATIAN about the year 170 c.e. As one of the earliest witnesses to the text of the Gospels (it
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Diatessaron
DiatessaronA harmony of the Gospels (Gk. dia tessarōn, “through [the] four”) in the form of a continuous narrative, compiled ca. 170 c.e. by Tatian.
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Diatessaron
Diatessaron [dīˊə tĕsˊə rŏn]. A harmony of the Gospels in the form of a continuous narrative, compiled ca. A.D. 170 by Tatian. See Synoptic Gospels; Syriac Versions.
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Diatessaron
DIATESSARON (Greek dia tessarōn, “through [the] four [Gospels]”) The name given by Eusebius in his Ecclesiastical History (Hist. Eccl. 4.29.6) to the book organized by Tatian around a.d. 170. Tatian combined the four canonical Gospels to create a single narrative of Jesus’s life. Although the Church
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Diatessaron
Diatessaron. The edition of the four Gospels in a continuous narrative, compiled by *Tatian about 150–60. From an early date it circulated widely in *Syriac-speaking Churches, where it became the standard text of the Gospels down to the 5th cent., when it gave way to the four separate Gospels. Its
Ecclesiastical Dictionary: Containing, in Concise Form, Information upon Ecclesiastical, Biblical, Archæological, and Historical Subjects
Diatessaron
Diatessaron.—A harmony of the four Gospels. The first work of this kind was that of Tatian (latter half of the second century), a Christian Apologist, but afterwards a Gnostic.
Pocket Dictionary of Liturgy & Worship
Diatessaron
Diatessaron. From Greek, meaning “by means of four,” a harmony of the *Gospel narratives constructed from the four canonical Gospels by Tatian, a one-time student of Justin Martyr. It was for a time the liturgical version of the Gospels used in *Syrian churches.
Dictionary of Theological Terms
Diatessaron
DiatessaronA harmony of the four gospels. The term is used especially in reference to the harmony composed by Tatian in the second century.
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 2, D–G
Diatessaron
Diatessaron di’uh-tes’uh-ron (from Greek διά G1328 + τέσσαρες G5475, “by means of four”). The name traditionally given to a harmony of the Gospels, compiled by Tatian, a Christian apologist from Mesopotamia who lived in Rome in the mid-2nd cent., until returning to the E in A.D. 172. The work consists
Encyclopedia of Ancient Christianity
Diatessaron
DIATESSARON. Mathematical-musical term (the harmony of the fourth) applied by *Tatian—a native of the East and disciple of *Justin at *Rome—to his harmony of the four gospels. Tatian’s was neither the only nor the first attempt to present the four distinct gospel accounts in a single unitary form, but
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
DIATESSARON
DIATESSARON. Literally “through the four,” a gospel harmony, reconstructed from fragments and translations composed in Syriac (or, possibly, Greek) about 172 ce by Tatian, it wove into a single narrative material from the four (proto) canonical gospels. Duplications and contradictions were removed as