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Dialogue of the Savior
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A fragmentary, noncanonical Coptic document in the Nag Hammadi codices. Depicts a supposed dialogue between the risen Jesus and Matthew, Judas, and Mary. This text was never widely authoritative in the early church period.
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The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Dialogue of the Savior
Dialogue of the Savior A fragmentary, noncanonical Coptic document in the Nag Hammadi codices. Depicts a supposed dialogue between the risen Jesus and Matthew, Judas, and Mary. This text was never widely authoritative in the early church period.
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Dialogue of the Savior
DIALOGUE OF THE SAVIOR (NHC III,5). The Dialogue of the Savior (Dial. Sav.) is the fifth and final treatise preserved in Codex III of the Nag Hammadi Library, discovered in Upper Egypt in 1945. See NAG HAMMADI (CODICES). Originally written—or better, compiled—in Greek, perhaps early in the 2d century
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Dialogue of the Redeemer
Dialogue of the Redeemer. A fragmentary document, sometimes called the ‘Dialogue of the Saviour’, found in Codex III of the *Nag Hammadi library. It presents a conversation between Christ (possibly after His Resurrection) and His disciples, particularly *Matthew, Judas, and *Mary [Magdalene]. There are
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 2, D–G
Dialogue of the Savior
Dialogue of the Savior. A Gnostic document preserved in the Nag Hammadi Library (NHC III, 5). The work consists of a dialogue between Jesus and his disciples, but scholars believe it is a compilation of several distinct sources. Originally composed in Greek, perhaps around A.D. 250, it is preserved only
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
SAVIOR, DIALOGUE OF THE
SAVIOR, DIALOGUE OF THE. This text has survived in a single exemplar of twenty-eight quite fragmentary papyrus pages written in the Coptic Sahidic dialect. The author is anonymous. The final compilation of the text took place no later than the 4th cent. ce, at which time the Nag Hammadi Codices were