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Delos
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
An island in the central Aegean Sea that was sacred to the Greeks as the mythological birthplace of Apollo and Artemis.The island is about 3 miles long and 1 mile wide. It was one of several places to which the Roman consul Lucius wrote a letter of protection for the Jews in 138–137 bc (1 Macc 15:16–23). Josephus cites a decree passed in Delos that confirmed exemption from military service for Jews who were Roman citizens (Antiquities 14.10.4).Because of its sacred status, births, deaths, and burials were forbidden there, and the nearby island of Rheneia served as a cemetery. Delos was prosperous in ancient times, but is now uninhabited. Several temples and other buildings have been excavated, and it is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Delos
Delos (Δηλος, Dēlos). An island in the central Aegean Sea that was sacred to the Greeks as the mythological birthplace of Apollo and Artemis.The island is about 3 miles long and 1 mile wide. It was one of several places to which the Roman consul Lucius wrote a letter of protection for the Jews in 138–137
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Delos (Place)
DELOS (PLACE) [Gk Dēlos (Δηλος)]. This central Aegean island is rich in Greco-Roman history, though it rests relatively deserted as modern Mikra Dili. Originally, Ionians (ca. 1000 b.c.) inhabited this small Greek island, which is only 3 miles long and 1 mile wide. But as the sacred seat of Apollo,
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Delos
Delos dē’los [Gk. Dēlos] (1 Macc. 15:23); AV DELUS. An island in the Aegean Sea. It is about 3 mi (5 km) long and 1 mi (1.6 km) wide, and is known in modern times as Mikra Dili. Its high point is Mt. Cynthus (350 ft [107 m]). Delos is listed among the names of kings and localities to which Lucius,
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
DELOS
DELOS<de’-los> ([Δη̂λος, Delos]): An island, now deserted, one of the Cyclades in the Aegean Sea, about 3 miles long and 1 mile broad, with a rocky mountain (Cynthus) several hundred feet high in the center. In antiquity Delos enjoyed great prosperity. According to Greek legend the island once floated
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 2, D–G
Delos
Delos dee’los (Δῆλος, “visible, conspicuous”). KJV Delus. A small Aegean island, regarded as the center of the Cyclades, which derive their name from their encirclement of Delos. That they do so is apparent to anyone viewing the panorama of surrounding islands and sea from the 480-ft. summit of Mount
The Eerdmans Encyclopedia of Early Christian Art and Archaeology, Volumes 1–3
Delos
DelosSmall (3.43 sq. km) island in the middle of the Cyclades (see map 9, K7); its solitude and isolation were a topos in Imperial literature, typified by the pun Δῆλος ἄδηλος (Delos is invisible) in Sibylline prophecy. Because of the dramatic decline in population after the events of 88 and 69 b.c.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Delos
DELOS, dēʹlos (Δῆλος, Dē̇los): An island, now deserted, one of the Cyclades in the Aegaean Sea, about 3 miles long and 1 mile broad, with a rocky mountain (Cynthus) several hundred feet high in the center. In antiquity Delos enjoyed great prosperity. According to Gr legend the island once floated
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
DELOS
DELOS dee´los [Δῆλος Dēlos]. A tiny, rocky island in the southern Aegean Sea at the center of the Cyclades archipelago, Delos served as the administrative seat of the Delian League, a confederacy of states aligned with ancient Athens. Greek myth (the Homeric Hymn to Apollo) identified Delos as the birthplace
b. Delos
b. Delos. Not all Greeks remained at home, however. On the island of DELOS we find the interaction of travelers and immigrants from all over the Mediterranean, and we see as well the intersection of several pantheons, not only the traditional Greek gods of the island, but also the Egyptian deities Isis,