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Deism
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A philosophical view of God that posits God as a Creator who set the universe in motion and then stepped back, no longer actively engaging with creation. This view was popular in 17th and 18th century Europe among those opposed to the excesses of organized religion. Deism emphasized the use of reason over revelation for deciding religious questions.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Deism
Deism A philosophical view of God that posits God as a Creator who set the universe in motion and then stepped back, no longer actively engaging with creation. This view was popular in 17th and 18th century Europe among those opposed to the excesses of organized religion. Deism emphasized the use of
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Deism
Deism (from Lat. Deus, ‘God’). The term, orig. interchangeable with *Theism (q.v.), i.e. belief in one Supreme Being as opposed to *atheism and polytheism, is now generally restricted to the system of natural religion which was first developed in England in the late 17th and 18th cents. Among its
Baker Encyclopedia of Christian Apologetics
Deism
Deism. Deism is the belief in a God who made the world but who never interrupts its operations with supernatural events. It is a theism minus miracles (see Miracle). God does not interfere with his creation. Rather, he designed it to run independent of him by immutable natural laws (see Spinoza, Benedict).
The Dictionary of Historical Theology
Deism
DeismA definition of ‘Deism’ is hard to come by and is perhaps best given by means of a historical description of it and through examining its proponents. Deism arose in the mid-sixteenth century out of a sense of dissatisfaction with traditional Christianity—with its basis on authority and Scripture,
Ecclesiastical Dictionary: Containing, in Concise Form, Information upon Ecclesiastical, Biblical, Archæological, and Historical Subjects
Deism
Deism.—System of those who, rejecting all revelation, believe only in the existence of God. Certain commentators confound Deism with Theism, seeking to designate thereby only the common foundation of all the philosophical doctrines which profess the belief in a God. But in the general acceptation, the
The Thiselton Companion to Christian Theology
Deism
DeismDeism flourished in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. In its popular form it expresses belief in a God who created the world, but in contrast to theism, Deism also holds that God cannot and does not engage with events in the world. Any such intervention would imply that creation was inadequate
Pocket Dictionary of Church History: Over 300 Terms Clearly and Concisely Defined
deism
deism. Called “the religion of the Enlightenment,” deism flourished in eighteenth-century France and England and soon found its way across the North Atlantic to New World hearts and minds. Deism, in its many varieties, was advanced by the discovery of the telescope, which charted the vast heavens, and
Dictionary of Theological Terms
Deism
DeismA kind of rationalism that flourished in England from the mid-17th century until the mid-18th century. It looked upon God as the absolute, self-existent, infinite Spirit, but denied that He had ever revealed Himself to men or that He ever intervened in the natural order of things.
Dictionary of Christianity and Science: The Definitive Reference for the Intersection of Christian Faith and Contemporary Science
Deism
DEISM During the Enlightenment (1650–1800), deism—from the Latin Deus (“God”)—rose to prominence. It reached its zenith in the 1790s in England, its country of origin, and in 1794 became France’s official national religion under Robespierre.Many have described this worldview as one in which a God who
A Dictionary of Early Christian Beliefs: A Reference Guide to More than 700 Topics Discussed by the Early Church Fathers
Deism
DEISMDeism is the belief that God exists and that he created the world, but that he exercises no providential care or control over either people or the material universe.The philosophers try to persuade us that God takes care of the universe, along with its genera and species. However, they say He
Evangelical Dictionary of Theology
Deism
Deism. Customarily an unorthodox religious view expressed among English writers beginning with Lord Herbert of Cherbury in the first half of the seventeenth century. It also denotes a movement of rationalistic thought manifested chiefly in England from the mid-seventeenth to the mid-eighteenth century.
The Jonathan Edwards Encyclopedia
Deism
DeismDeism is the religious philosophical movement during the Enlightenment that endorsed so-called natural religion or the religion of nature. Deists categorically denied special revelation, or at least the necessity of it. Thus, if purported, special revelation was not rejected as such; rather, it