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Degree
Degrees
Dictionaries
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Degree
Degree The RSV uses this term twice as a general expression of rank or status. In Lk. 1:52 it translates Gk. tapeínos (“low degree”), rendered “humble” by the NEB. In 1 Cor. 3:18 the RSV supplies “degree” to translate the Gk. apó dóxēs eis dóxan. In the AV this term is also used in the obsolete
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Degree
DEGREE. The Bible speaks of men of high degree (1 Chr 17:17) and of low degree (Lk 1:52; Jas 1:9) with reference to their position in human society, whether they be exalted like David or of humble circumstances.The deacons who serve well “purchase to themselves a good degree” (1 Tim 3:13, KJV), i.e.,
The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary
Degree
DEGREE (Heb. ma˓ălâ, a “step”). This term is used of a group of Levites “of the second degree” (1 Chron. 15:18, KJV; NASB and NIV, “rank”) in the sense of rank or order of enumeration. David, in the expression “Thou … hast regarded me according to the standard of a man of high degree” (17:17), seems
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
DEGREE
DEGREE<de-gre’> ([מַעֲלָה‎, màalah], “a going up” or “ascent,” hence, a staircase or flight of steps; “rank”: [ταπεινός, tapeinos], “low”): By derivation it should mean “a step down” (Latin, de, down, gradus, step). It is used, however, of any step, up or down; then of grade or rank, whether
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 2, D–G
Degree
degree. This English term (which once could mean “step”) occurs frequently in the KJV as a rendering of Hebrew maʿălâ H5092, used, for example, of the steps in the stairway of Ahaz (2 Ki. 20:9–11; see dial). The phrase “song of degrees” is found in the titles of Ps. 120–34 (NIV, “song of ascents”);
The International Standard Bible Encyclopaedia, Volumes 1–5
Degree
DEGREE, dē̇-grēʹ (מַעֲלָה‎, ma‛ălāh, “a going up” or “ascent,” hence a staircase or flight of steps; “rank”: ταπεινός, tapeinós, “low”): By derivation it should mean “a step down” (Lat, de, down, gradus, step). It is used, however, of any step, up or down; then of grade or rank, whether high or low.