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Decretum Gelasianum
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A sixth-century Latin manuscript usually attributed to Pope Gelasius I in ad 492–96 (though it is alternately attributed to Pope Damasus and Pope Hormisdas; Metzger, Canon, 188). The five-part document includes lists of:• Old and New Testament books accepted by the church• sixty-two “apocryphal” (rejected) works (including the Gospel of Bartholomew, Letters of Christ and Abgar, and the Acts of Philip)• thirty-five “heretical” authors (including Montanus and Marcion)The list may have been generated outside of Rome and privately, instead of by the pope, and only later attributed to him; this point is debated (Hahneman, Muratorian Fragment, 160; von Dobschutz, Das Decretum Gelasianum as cited in Metzger, Canon, 188).
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Decretum Gelasianum
Decretum Gelasianum A sixth-century Latin manuscript usually attributed to Pope Gelasius I in ad 492–96 (though it is alternately attributed to Pope Damasus and Pope Hormisdas; Metzger, Canon, 188). The five-part document includes lists of:• Old and New Testament books accepted by the church• sixty-two
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Decretum Gelasianum
Decretum GelasianumA Latin document dating in its present form to the 6th century c.e.; traditionally attributed to Pope Gelasius (492–496) but perhaps reflecting the synodical decisions of 382 under Pope Damasus. Of particular significance for the establishment of the Christian canon are its lists
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Decretum Gelasianum
Decretum Gelasianum [dĕkˊrə təm gĕl āˊsēănˊəm].† A Latin document dating in its present form to the sixth century A.D.; traditionally attributed to Pope Gelasius (492–496) but perhaps reflecting the synodical decisions of 382 under Pope Damasus. Of particular significance for the establishment
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Decretum Gelasianum
Decretum Gelasianum. An early Latin document, handed down most frequently under the name of Pope *Gelasius (492–6), but in some MSS as the work of *Damasus (366–84) or *Hormisdas (514–23), containing inter alia a Latin list of the Books of the Bible. Acc. to E. von Dobschütz, it is not a Papal work at
Encyclopedia of Ancient Christianity
DECRETUM GELASIANUM
DECRETUM GELASIANUM. A composite document that begins with the title Incipit concilium urbis Romae, sub Damaso papa. De explanatione fidei. Its five chapters, grouped in two parts (1–3; 4–5), deal with the names of Christ and of the Holy Spirit (ch. 1); provide a list of the books of the OT and NT (ch.