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Day
Date • Days
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Day
Day. Most literally, a period of time delimited by the earth’s rotation around its axis, such as the period between two consecutive sunrises; also, the portion of that period in which the sun is visible, the other portion being called “night.” The word “day” occurs over 2,000 times in the OT, over 350
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Day
Day The usual Hebrew term for day is yôm, which derives from a common Semitic root yawm. The usual Greek term is hēméra. The basic meaning of “day” expresses a division of the solar unit of time, but its use in a great variety of biblical contexts reveals a wide semantic range.
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Day
DAY Most literally, a period of time delimited by the earth’s rotation around its axis, such as the period between two consecutive sunrises; also, the portion of that period in which the sun is visible, the other portion being called “night.” The word “day” occurs over 2,000 times in the OT, over 350
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Day
Day“Day” (Heb. yôm; Gk. hēméra) may designate a definite time period. When “day” is accompanied by a definite number (e.g., Gen. 1:5, 8; 7:11; Exod. 16:1; Lev. 23:34) it points only to a 24-hour period. This time extends from sunset to sunset, comprising “evening, morning, and noon” (Ps. 55:17 [MT
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Day
Day (Heb. yôm; Gk. hēméra). The Israelites, who divided the year according to a lunar calendar, considered the day to start in the evening and end the following evening. Accordingly, they celebrated the Passover at sunset (Exod. 12:18) and commenced the Sabbath shortly thereafter (Lev. 23:32;
Dictionary of Deities and Demons in the Bible
Day
DAY יוםI. The Hebrew noun yôm, ‘day’, frequently occurs in the OT (2304 times; the Aram cognate yôm occurs 16 times in Dan and Ezra). The noun has a common Semitic background and is not derived from a verb (von Soden, Bergman & Saebø 1982:561–562). At some instances in the OT ‘day’ is personified.
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Day
DAY In Scripture, “day” has roughly the same range of meanings that it has in our language. Primarily, day is the period of daylight from sunrise to sunset, as opposed to night (see, for example, Num 11:32). It may also mean the whole period of night and day from sunset to sunset (see, for example, Lev
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Day
Day. The variable length of the natural day at different seasons led in the very earliest times to the adoption of the civil day (or one revolution of the sun) as a standard of time. The Hebrews reckoned the day from evening to evening, Lev. 23:32, deriving it from Gen. 1:5, “the evening and the morning
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Day
DayThe Jews reckoned the day from sunset to sunset (Lev. 23:32). It was originally divided into three parts (Ps. 55:17). “The heat of the day” (1 Sam. 11:11; Neh. 7:3) was at our nine o’clock, and “the cool of the day” just before sunset (Gen. 3:8). Before the Captivity the Jews divided the night into
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Day
DAY — the 24-hour period between two successive risings of the sun. The Hebrew people reckoned their day from evening to evening, the period of time between two successive sunsets (Gen. 1:5, 8; Ex. 12:18; Lev. 23:32).The Bible also uses the word “day” in a symbolic sense, as in “the day of His wrath” (Job
Dictionary of Biblical Imagery
Day, Day of the Lord
Day, Day of the LordThe Day of the Lord and related ideas occur most frequently in the prophets, the parables and sayings of Jesus, the book of Revelation, and other portions of the NT dealing with the end times. Images and ideas associated with the Day of the Lord can also be found in the historical
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
DAY
DAY<da> ([יוֹם‎, yom]; [ἡμέρα, hemera]): This common word has caused some trouble to plain readers, because they have not noticed that the word is used in several different senses in the English Bible. When the different uses of the word are understood the difficulty of interpretation vanishes. We