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David Hume
b. May 7, 1711 – d. August 25, 1776 • Historian • Philosopher
Dictionaries
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church
Hume, David
Hume, David (1711–76), Scottish philosopher and historian. He was a native of Edinburgh, where he was educated, and at an early age resolved to become a philosopher. From 1734 to 1737 he lived in France, where he elaborated his sceptical principles and wrote the Treatise of Human Nature (3 vols., 1739–40),
Baker Encyclopedia of Christian Apologetics
David Hume
Hume, David. David Hume (1711–1776), philosopher and historian, was born and reared in Edinburgh, Scotland and attended Edinburgh University. He earned a degree in law but soon after decided not to practice. Instead, during the height of the European Enlightenment, Hume took up a rigorous study of philosophy.
The Dictionary of Historical Theology
Hume, David (1711–76)
Hume, David (1711–76)Scottish philosopher. Hume was born in Edinburgh, and he enrolled at its university in 1723, aged twelve. He did not take a degree, but there he became enamoured of the ‘new philosophy’ that, in the wake of Sir Isaac Newton, was promoting an inductive, ‘experimental method of reasoning’.
Compton’s Encyclopedia
Hume, David
Hume, David(1711–76). A Scottish philosopher and historian, David Hume was a founder of the skeptical, or agnostic, school of philosophy. He had a profound influence on European intellectual life.David Hume was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on April 26 (Old Style), 1711. His father, Joseph Hume (or
Dictionary of Phrase and Fable
Hume, David
Hume (David), the historian, takes the lead among modern philosophical sceptics. His great argument is this: It is more likely that testimony should be false than that miracles should be true. (1711–1776.)
The Westminster Dictionary of Theologians
Hume, David
Hume, David (1711–76). Philosopher, economist, ethicist, and historian, born in Scotland. H. was an empiricist philosopher who rejected metaphysics as being merely speculative and incapable of providing truths that can be scientifically verified. True knowledge is based on experience. Therefore much
The Thiselton Companion to Christian Theology
Hume, David
Hume, DavidDavid Hume (1711–1776) is the most radical of the British empiricists, developing further the work of John Locke and George Berkeley, but differing in his conclusions. He was born and educated in Edinburgh, and served as a librarian and administrator. His cardinal principle was that we cannot
Evangelical Dictionary of Theology
Hume, David
Hume, David (1711–76). A Scottish philosopher and historian. Born and educated in Edinburgh, Hume became one of the key British philosophers of the Enlightenment. During a three-year visit in France (1734–37) he wrote A Treatise of Human Nature, published in three volumes in 1739–40 after his return
The Jonathan Edwards Encyclopedia
Hume, David
Hume, David (1711–1776)A University of Edinburgh librarian and Scottish philosopher and historian, Hume was part of the British empiricist movement. Though raised a Calvinist, Hume became a skeptic and a naturalist, denied innate ideas, emphasized the passions over reason, and argued that the only basis
New Dictionary of Theology: Historical and Systematic
Hume, David (1711–76)
HUME, DAVID (1711–76)Such is Hume’s influence on philosophy in the English-speaking world of the twentieth century that he has been described as the founder of modern *philosophy of religion. He himself, in his general philosophy, can be regarded as a radical descendant of *Locke, using and developing
Who’s Who in Christian History
Hume, David
Hume, David (1711–1776)Scottish historian and philosopherHume’s major work was in epistomology, where he argued that men have no a priori knowledge of fact and no empirically based knowledge of facts beyond their present experience. Thus, while people know the experiences they presently have, this