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Daric
Dram
Dictionaries
Baker Encyclopedia of the Bible
Dram
Dram. kjv for daric, a Persian gold coin, in 1 Chronicles 29:7; Ezra 2:69; 8:27; and Nehemiah 7:70–72.See Coins.
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised
Daric
Daric darʹik [Heb. darkemôn, ’aḏarkôn; Gk. dareikós]; AV DRAM; NEB also DRACHMA. A Persian gold coin, the first to be mentioned in the Bible. The first form of the word occurs in 1 Ch. 29:7; Ezr. 2:69; Neh. 7:70ff, the second in Ezr. 8:27. The name was supposedly a shortened form of the name of
Tyndale Bible Dictionary
Dram
DRAM* kjv for daric, a Persian gold coin, in 1 Chronicles 29:7, Ezra 2:69, 8:27, and Nehemiah 7:70–72. See Coins.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Daric
daric (dair´ik; Heb. ’adarkon), a gold coin, probably introduced by Darius I. The word “daric” was originally used as an adjective to modify “stater”: a “daric stater” (Gk. dareikos stater) denotes a stater of the Persian ruler Darius; later, the term was shortened to “daric.” It is used of temple building
The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia
Daric
DARIC. A gold Persian coin worth about five dollars, known to the Jews after their return from Babylon (Ezr 8:27, RSV). The name is presumably derived from “Darius,” the Persian king (522–486 b.c.), and is rendered “dram” in KJV. It is the first coin mentioned in the Bible. The writer in 1 Chr 29:7 may
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Daric
DaricA Persian gold coin weighing ca. 8.4 g. (.3 oz.), bearing the image of Darius I Hystaspes (ca. 500 b.c.e.) and therefore assumed to have been coined by that ruler. The name may derive from Akk. darag mana (one sixtieth of a mina; Heb. ʾăḏarkôn; Ezra 8:27; cf. 1 Chr. 29:7). The coin (darkĕmôn)
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Daric
Daric [dărˊĭk]. A Persian gold coin weighing about 8.4 g. (.3 oz.), bearing the image of Darius I Hystaspes (ca. 500 B.C.) and therefore assumed to have been coined by that ruler; it is possible that the name derived from Akk. darag mana (one-sixtieth of a mina). In the Old Testament the term
Catholic Bible Dictionary
Daric
DARIC A gold coin of Persia (Ezra 2:69; Neh 7:70–72) that was first struck by Darius I (r. 522–486 b.c.). (See Money.)
Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Daric
Daric (from dara, a king), Authorized Version “dram,” 1 Chron. 29:7; Ezra 2:69; 8:27; Neh. 7:70, 71, 72, a gold coin current in Palestine in the period after the return from Babylon. It weighed 128 grains, and was worth about five dollars. At these times there was no large issue of gold money except
Easton’s Bible Dictionary
Daric
Daricin the Revised Version of 1 Chr. 29:7; Ezra 2:69; 8:27; Neh. 7:70–72, where the Authorized Version has “dram.” It is the rendering of the Hebrew darkemon and the Greek dareikos. It was a gold coin, bearing the figure of a Persian King with his crown and armed with bow and arrow. It was current
Dram
DramThe Authorized Version understood the word ‘adarkonim (1 Chr. 29:7; Ezra 8:27), and the similar word darkomnim (Ezra 2:69; Neh. 7:70), as equivalent to the Greek silver coin the drachma. But the Revised Version rightly regards it as the Greek dareikos, a Persian gold coin (the daric) of the value
Harper’s Bible Dictionary
Daric
Daricdaric (dairʹik; Heb. adarkon; Ezra 8:27; 1 Chron. 29:7; Heb. darkemon [drachma?]: Ezra 2:69; Neh. 7:70, 72), a gold coin, probably introduced by Darius I. The Greek term dareikos stater denotes a stater of Darius. The word ‘daric’ was originally used as an adjective to modify stater; later the
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia
DARIC
DARIC<dar’-ik> ([דַּרְכְּמוֹן‎, darkemon], and [אַדַרְכּוֹן‎, ’adharkon]; [δαρεικός, dareikos]): A Persian gold coin about a guinea or five dollars in value. The first form of the word occurs in 1 Chronicles 29:7; Ezra 2:69, and Nehemiah 7:70-72; the second in Ezra 8:27 and is rendered, “dram”