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Cynics
Excerpt from the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the most advanced Bible dictionary.
A well-known philosophical movement—though not an official philosophical school of thought—that stressed the importance of a virtuous life consisting of self-control and self-sufficiency. Although the Cynic movement had largely died out by the late third century bc, some claim that Christianity adopted some of its ideas, especially regarding asceticism.
Dictionaries
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
Cynicism
Cynicism A well-known philosophical movement—though not an official philosophical school of thought—that stressed the importance of a virtuous life consisting of self-control and self-sufficiency. Although the Cynic movement had largely died out by the late third century bc, some claim that Christianity
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Cynics
CYNICS. Adherents of the Greek school of philosophers who held that virtue is the only good and that its essence lies in self-control and independence.A. Historical Outline1. Early Cynicism2. Imperial CynicismB. NameC. Appearance and Manner of LifeD. Cynic TeachingsE. Impact of Cynicism1. Cynicism
The Zondervan Encyclopedia of the Bible, Volume 1, A–C
Cynics
Cynics. Cynicism, though not a formal school of thought, was an influential Greek philosophical movement that originated in the 4th cent. b.c. through the teachings of Antisthenes (a disciple of Socrates); it declined two centuries later but continued to attract adherents through the Roman period and
The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volumes 1–5
CYNICS
CYNICS, CYNICISM sin´ik, sin´uh-siz´uhm. The varied “dogged” followers (“cynic” comes from Greek kynikos [κυνικός], meaning “dog”) of the ascetic lifestyle of the philosopher, Diogenes of Sinope (ca. 300 bce), made their presence felt together in the public places of Mediterranean towns until ca. 550
4. The Cynics
4. The CynicsAncient writers established perhaps dubious lines of succession to trace philosophical influence. Diogenes Laertius (1.13–20) breaks the world of philosophy into two broad streams, an Ionian that begins with Thales, and an Italian that includes Pythagoras and Parmenides. The Ionian school